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$1.7M awarded to ENT Surgery and collaborators for The AIRSPACE Trial

Professor PJ Wormald, Associate Professor Sarah Vreugde, Professor Alkis Psaltis (R-L in photo) and Dr Oveis Pourmehran from ENT Surgery at the BHI, TQEH, and their fellow chief investigators (listed below this article) have been awarded a Medical Research Future Fund (MRFF) grant in the "Rare Cancers Rare Diseases and Unmet Need" category.

Celebrating 60 years of research at TQEH

Photo L-R: Mr Paul Flynn, CEO THRF Group, Professor John Beltrame AM, Director of Research CALHN, Professor Richard Ruffin, Her Excellency the Honourable Frances Adamson AC, Mr Raymond Spencer, Chair CALHN, Dr Prue Cowled and Professor Guy Maddern, Director of Research BHI, TQEH.

Adelaide node of A3BC welcomes first participant!

The Adelaide node of the Australian Arthritis & Autoimmune Biobank Collaborative (A3BC), coordinated at the BHI, TQEH by Professor Catherine Hill and Dr Carlee Ruediger, has welcomed its first participant, Justin Baldwin, who completed his questionnaires and provided blood samples to kickstart the data collection.

Professor Sandra Peake is Chief Investigator on MRFF Grant to conduct trial on septic shock

Professor Sandra Peake, Director of Intensive Care Medicine at The Queen Elizabeth Hospital and Chair of the Australian and New Zealand Intensive Care Society Clinical Trials Group, and collaborators from across Australia have received a 2 year, $2,335,540 grant from the Australian Government’s Medical Research Future Fund (MRFF) to conduct the “Australasian Resuscitation In Sepsis Evaluation Fluids or Vasopressors in Emergency Department Sepsis trial (ARISE Fluids)", a multicentre, randomised, clinical trial.

2020 BHI Invited Speaker Seminar Series commences

Professor John Spertus, cardiologist and the Lauer/Missouri Endowed Chair and Professor of Medicine at the University of Missouri-Kansas City, where he serves as the Clinical Director of Outcomes Research at Saint Luke’s Mid America Heart Institute, kicked off the BHI Invited Speaker Seminar Series yesterday.

SA Department for Innovation & Skills: Research, Commercialisation & Startup Fund (RCSF) – Strategic Research Initiatives (Stream1)

The Research, Commercialisation and Start-up Fund (RCSF) supports collaboration between businesses, researchers and universities to solve industrial problems, commercialise new products and services, attract investment into research and research infrastructure into the State and encourage the establishment and growth of start-ups.

SA’s Chief Scientist visits the Basil Hetzel Institute

South Australia's Chief Scientist Professor Caroline McMillen met with the Director of Research at The Queen Elizabeth Hospital, Professor Guy Maddern, and the Director of Research for the Central Adelaide Local Health Network, Professor John Beltrame, and toured the Basil Hetzel Institute on Monday 29th April.

Sarah and Zelalem awarded prizes at Florey Postgraduate Research Conference

Congratulations to Basil Hetzel Institute PhD students Sarah Bernhardt (Breast Biology and Cancer Unit) and Zelalem Mekonnen (Virology Group) for being awarded the Adelaide Medical School Prize and Research and Business Partnerships Prize (sponsored by CMAX) respectively at The University of Adelaide Florey Postgraduate Research Conference.

In the news: TQEH gastroenterologist Dr Sam Costello talks about BiomeBank – Australia’s first public stool bank

21.03.20180 comments

In the news: Prof PJ Wormald and Dr Katharina Richter, ENT Surgery

07.03.20180 comments

SA Winner of Fresh Science is Dr Katharina Richter, ENT Surgery

06.03.20180 comments

In the news: Dr Anupam Gupta, TQEH Rehabilitation Consultant

06.03.20180 comments

In the news: Professor Tim Price, TQEH oncologist and researcher

21.02.20180 comments

Two consecutive TQEH Research Days held in 2017

20.10.20170 comments

Spring graduation for PhD students from the BHI

19.09.20170 comments

Dean’s Commendation awarded to Dr Katharina Richter

25.07.20170 comments

BHI Winning News: THRF grant recipients summarise their project aims

06.07.20170 comments

Dr Pallave Dasari named as one of the first “Superstars of STEM”

04.07.20170 comments

THRF announce $2.7 million of funding to BHI and TQEH

15.06.20170 comments

Congratulations to two BHI researchers for winning Virology Conference Awards

15.06.20170 comments

SBS TV’s Insight ‘Gut Feeling’ with TQEH Gastroenterologist Dr Sam Costello

07.06.20170 comments

Dean’s Commendation awarded to Dr Dijana Miljkovic

03.05.20170 comments

Jason Gummow receives University award for thesis excellence

15.02.20170 comments

High Commissioner of the Republic of Botswana visits the Virology Group

07.12.20160 comments

Frontline attack against HIV infection is closer to reality

22.11.20160 comments

The 25th Anniversary of TQEH Research Day was a great success!

21.10.20160 comments

Clinical Practice Unit researchers are finalists in the 2016 SA Health Awards

19.10.20160 comments

Congratulations to three PhD students – Bill, Sven & Abdul

04.10.20160 comments

Congratulations to 3MT People’s Choice Winner – Katharina Richter

15.09.20160 comments

Final BHI ‘Talking Heads’ Seminar for 2016

08.09.20160 comments

Results of pilot NACIAM study presented in Rome

30.08.20160 comments

Postdoctoral researcher Dr Amy Holmes is short listed for LUSH prize

25.08.20160 comments

BHI researchers discuss their work on 5AA radio today

18.08.20160 comments

PhD student Katharina Richter is in the University of Adelaide 3MT Final

11.08.20160 comments

SA Science Excellence Awards – Dr Kristin Carson is a finalist

11.08.20160 comments

Visit the BHI booth at Science Alive! this weekend

04.08.20160 comments

Associate Professor Wendy Ingman receives an award from the University of Adelaide

09.06.20160 comments

ASMR Gala Dinner: THRF sponsors 10 BHI students to attend

07.06.20160 comments

Professor PJ Wormald and the phage therapy trial targeted at antibiotic-resistant “superbugs”

07.06.20160 comments

PhD student Cher-Rin Chong is flying off to Oxford for a prestigious post-doc!

26.05.20160 comments

PhD student Dijana Miljkovic’s research in ‘The Lead’ article

10.05.20160 comments

Dr Basil Hetzel AC one of 5 prominent nonagenarians to welcome the Queen into their exclusive club!

21.04.20160 comments

PhD student Khamis Tomusange story on ABC online

12.04.20160 comments

Two PhD students are Finalists in the Channel 9 Young Achiever Awards

17.02.20160 comments

Professor John Beltrame on Channel 9 news

16.12.20150 comments

Coast FM radio interview with Bill Panagopoulos

16.12.20150 comments

Clinical Research Nurse

Cured By Salt

Cured by Salt is an internal newsletter updating students and staff on the latest news and achievements of our researchers, upcoming seminars, and other important news.

Conference Support

With thanks to The Hospital Research Foundation Group, we are pleased to open the BHI Conference Support Grants for 2024.

The Impact Factor

The Impact Factor, the relaunched BHI newsletter, is now available to view/download.
Mastitis and Lactation Insufficiency
Lactation mastitis is an inflammatory breast disease affecting 17-27% of Australian breastfeeding women that causes pain, fever and low milk supply. The challenges posed by this disease lead many women to use supplementary formula, or cease breastfeeding altogether leaving their infants at increased risk of respiratory and gastrointestinal diseases as babies, and non-communicable diseases including heart disease, obesity, diabetes, cancer, allergies, asthma, mental illness and chronic lung, liver and renal diseases as both children and adults. Our recent research has suggested that macrophages play a role in development of this disease. Our current research pursues new knowledge in how disease state develop in the breast. We explore revolutionary new concepts of how immune cells function in the breast, and how these cells affect breast disease development.
Exploring the impact of menstrual cycling on personalised medicine for premenopausal breast cancer patients
Gene expression profiling of breast cancer is a technology increasingly being adopted in the clinic as a personalised medicine approach to tailor treatment to individual patients. However, an underappreciated factor in premenopausal breast cancer diagnosis is that oestrogen and progesterone fluctuate dramatically during the menstrual cycle, and these hormones are likely to affect gene expression. Our research aims to determine whether fluctuation in oestrogen and progesterone associated with different stages of the menstrual cycle significantly affects gene expression profiles in breast cancers from premenopausal women.
Breast Cancer Risk and Prevention
Reducing breast cancer risk starts with developing a better understanding of how the disease develops. Breast density (also known as mammographic density) is the percentage of white and bright regions on a mammogram. Breast density is not related to how breasts look or feel and can only be assessed by mammogram. High breast density is both an independent risk factor for breast cancer and masks cancers on a mammogram. There is exciting potential for breast density to become a widespread health assessment tool, used to identify the women most at risk of breast cancer in order to intervene early and reduce that risk. Our research studies the underlying biology of breast density and how it affects the risk of breast cancer.
Artificial intelligence in breast cancer detection and diagnosis
Machine learning is a form of artificial intelligence that enables computers to learn how to do complex tasks without being programmed by humans. This technology is driving what is known as the “fourth industrial revolution”. It has the potential to deliver massive benefits in biomedicine and we are only just starting to explore its capability. Working with experts in engineering, pathology, biology, radiology and artificial intelligence, we are developing new computational systems that aid in the accurate and efficient detection and diagnosis of breast cancer.
Coronary Angiogram Database of South Australia (CADOSA): Improving health outcomes (e.g. readmissions) in patients undergoing coronary angiography
Coronary angiography is the clinical benchmark technique in the assessment of coronary artery disease with more than 6,000 performed in South Australia each year. Despite its diagnostic benefits in identifying the presence of coronary disease, its benefit to the patient has been less rigorously studied and will be the focus of this project. CADOSA is an internationally renowned clinical registry incorporating global links with organizations including the American College of Cardiology National Cardiovascular Data Registry and the International Consortium of Health Outcomes Measurement (ICHOM). Location: Basil Hetzel Institute for Translational Health Research, The Queen Elizabeth Hospital Special Requirements: DCSI Clearance, Vaccinations 

Project Team: Beltrame J , Labrosciano C

Professor John Beltrame: Student Research Projects for 2024
Please also refer to Professor John Beltrame's University of Adelaide Researcher Profile

Effect of fecal microbiota transplantation on 8-week remission in patients with ulcerative colitis: a randomized clinical trial

Costello SP, Hughes PA, Waters O, Bryant RV, Vincent AD, Blatchford P, Katsikeros R, Makanyanga J, Campaniello MA, Mavrangelos C, Rosewarne CP, Bickley C, Peters C, Schoeman MN, Conlon MA, Roberts-Thomson IC, Andrews JM. Effect of fecal microbiota transplantation on 8-week remission in patients with ulcerative colitis: a randomized clinical trial. JAMA; 2019. 321(2): 156-164

Research Dietitian

KEY PUBLICATIONS

Please refer to the financial year Publication Lists for an annual updated list or researcher profiles for a full list of publications.

Microbial manipulation

Costello, S., Hughes, P., Waters, O., Bryant, R., Vincent, A., Blatchford, P., . . . Andrews, J. (2019). Effect of fecal microbiota transplantation on 8-week remission in patients with ulcerative colitis: a randomized clinical trial. JAMA – Journal of the American Medical Association, 321(2), 156-164.

Raja, S. S., Bryant, R. V., Costello, S. P., Barnett, M., Schubert, J., & Rayner, C. K. (2023). Systematic review of therapies for refractory ulcerative proctitis. Journal of Gastroenterology and Hepatology (Australia), 38(4), 14 pages.

Tucker, E. C., Haylock-Jacobs, S., Rapaic, M., Dann, L. M., Bryant, R. V., & Costello, S. P. (2023). Stool donor screening within a Therapeutic Goods Administration compliant donor screening program for fecal microbiota transplantation. JGH Open, 7(3), 172-177.

Bogatic, D, Bryant, RV, Lynch, KD, Costello, SP. Systematic review: microbial manipulation as therapy for primary sclerosing cholangitis. Aliment Pharmacol Ther. 2023; 57: 23– 36. https://doi.org/10.1111/apt.17251

Bryant, R. V., Day, A. S., McGrath, K. C., Telfer, K., Yao, C. K., & Costello, S. P. (2021). Fecal microbiota transplantation augmented by a sulfide-reducing diet for refractory ulcerative colitis: A case report with functional metagenomic analysis. JGH Open, 5(9), 1099-1102.

Costello, S. P., Day, A., Yao, C. K., & Bryant, R. V. (2020). Faecal microbiota transplantation (FMT) with dietary therapy for acute severe ulcerative colitis.. BMJ Case Rep, 13(8), e233135.

Soo, W. T., Bryant, R. V., & Costello, S. P. (2020). Faecal microbiota transplantation: Indications, evidence and safety. Australian Prescriber, 43(2), 36-38.

Diet & IBD

Day, A. S., Yao, C. K., Costello, S. P., Ruszkiewicz, A., Andrews, J. M., Gibson, P. R., & Bryant, R. V. (2022). Therapeutic Potential of the 4 Strategies to SUlfide-REduction (4-SURE) Diet in Adults with Mild to Moderately Active Ulcerative Colitis: An Open-Label Feasibility Study. Journal of Nutrition, 152(7), 1690-1701.

Day, A. S., Yao, C. K., Costello, S. P., Andrews, J. M., & Bryant, R. V. (2022). Food-related quality of life in adults with inflammatory bowel disease is associated with restrictive eating behaviour, disease activity and surgery: A prospective multicentre observational study. Journal of Human Nutrition and Dietetics, 35(1), 234-244.

Davis, R., Day, A., Barrett, J., Vanlint, A., Andrews, J. M., Costello, S. P., & Bryant, R. V. (2020). Habitual dietary fibre and prebiotic intake is inadequate in patients with inflammatory bowel disease: findings from a multicentre cross-sectional study.. Journal of Human Nutrition and Dietetics, 34(2), 420-428.

Gastrointestinal Ultrasound

Goodsall, T. M., Nguyen, T. M., Parker, C. E., Ma, C., Andrews, J. M., Jairath, V., & Bryant, R. V. (2021). Systematic review: Gastrointestinal ultrasound scoring indices for inflammatory bowel disease.. J Crohns Colitis, 15(1), 125-142.

Helicobacter pylori

Schubert, J. P., Woodman, R. J., Mangoni, A. A., Rayner, C. K., Warner, M. S., Roberts-Thomson, I. C., . . . Bryant, R. V. (2022). Geospatial analysis of Helicobacter pylori infection in South Australia: Should location influence eradication therapy?. Journal of Gastroenterology and Hepatology (Australia), 37(7), 1263-1274.

Schubert, J. P., Rayner, C. K., Costello, S. P., Roberts-Thomson, I. C., Forster, S. C., & Bryant, R. V. (2022). Helicobacter pylori: Have potential benefits been overlooked?. JGH Open, 6(11), 735-737.

Current trials and projects underway within IBD

Project: Examining a Sulphide-Reducing Diet as Therapy in Ulcerative Colitis: A Randomised, Single-Blind, Placebo-Controlled Dietary Advice Trial (EAT-UC RCT)

Principle investigators: Dr Alice Day & Associate Professor Rob Bryant

Associate investigators & collaborators: Dr Sam Costello, Prof Peter Gibson, Dr Sam Forster, Dr CK Yao, Prof Chris Probert, Malcolm Hebblewhite

 

Project: Faecal microbiota transplantation for maintenance of remission of Crohn’s disease

Principle investigator: Dr Karmen Telfer, MBBS, studying for MPhil

Supervisors: Prof Philip Weinstein, University of Adelaide, Dr Sam Costello

 

Project: Faecal microbiota transplantation for refractory ulcerative proctitis.

Principle investigator: Dr Sreecanth Raja, MBBS, studying for MPhil

Supervisors: Professor Christopher Rayner, University of Adelaide, A/Prof Robert Bryant, Dr Sam Costello

 

Project: Exclusive enteral nutrition in Inflammatory Bowel Disease

Principle investigator: Dr Matthew Chu, MBBS, studying for MPhil

Supervisors: A/Prof Robert Bryant, Dr Alice Day

 

Project: Helicobacter pylori resistance patterns in Australia

Principle investigator: Dr Jonathon Schubert, MBBS, studying for PhD

Supervisors: Professor Christopher Rayner, University of Adelaide, A/Prof Robert Bryant, Prof Ian Roberts-Thompson

 

Project: Intestinal ultrasound in Crohn’s disease

Dr Thomas Goodsall, MBBS, studying for PhD

Supervisors: Prof Jane Andrews, University of Adelaide, A/Prof Robert Bryant, A/Prof Chris Ma, University of Calgary

 

Project: Dietitian First clinic in Functional Gastrointestinal Disorders

Principle investigator: Samantha Plush, APD, studying for PhD

Supervisors: A/Prof Robert Bryant, Dr Alice Day, Professor Saravana Kumar, University South Australia

 

Project: Intestinal ultrasound to identify gastrointestinal contents

Principle investigator: Dr Ryan Mathias, MBBS, studying for PhD

Supervisors: A/Prof Robert Bryant, Dr Sam Costello, Dr Alice Day

 

Project: A dedicated Inflammatory Bowel Disease diet clinic (IBDDC): evaluating patient outcome measures, new modes of service delivery, and cost utility.

Principle investigator: Dr Alice Day

Associate investigators & collaborators: A/Prof Rob Bryant, Sangwoo Han, Dr Jyoti Khadka University of South Australia, Dr Matthew Chu

Director of Innovation and Research Translation

Senior Research Podiatrist

Associate Research Professor

Research Coordinator

IBD Clinical Fellow

Clinical Research Coordinator

Grant funded scientist

Senior Academic Dietitian

Staff Surgeon

TQEH Research Dinner

A gala dinner celebrating 60 years of life-changing research at The Queen Elizabeth Hospital (TQEH) and the 30th anniversary of TQEH Research Expo was held at the National Wine Centre on Wednesday 13 October 2021.

LCMS Analyst

Case Reports

Case reports aim to improve global health and increase clinical understanding by conveying important best practice information or by sharing teaching points from rare or unusual situations.

Ethical Review – National Mutual Acceptance

Australian state and territory Departments of Health have signed a Memorandum of Understanding for mutual acceptance of scientific and ethical review of multi-centre human research projects undertaken in Public Health Organisations, known as the National Mutual Acceptance scheme (NMA). CALHN is a participating NMA organisation and the Central Adelaide Local Health Network HREC is a NMA Certified Human Research Ethics Committee. Please note: Under the SA Health Research Ethics Policy Directive South Australian public health institutions do not accept HREC approval under the NMA scheme for First in Human, Phase 0 and Phase 1 Clinical Trials, and Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander projects. These projects must be submitted for ethical review by a SA Health HREC. Further information about CALHN HREC member composition, meeting dates, submission deadlines and contact details is available here. Further information about the National Mutual Acceptance scheme, and a list of participating HRECs and Organisations is available here.

Triggers for Ethical Review

In some instances, ethical review of a QA/QI or clinical audit activity is required. These may include:
  • Where the activity potentially infringes the privacy or professional reputation of participants, providers or the organisation
  • Secondary use of data – using data or analysis from QA/QI activities for another purpose
  • Gathering information about the participant beyond that which is collected routinely. Information may include biospecimens or additional investigations
  • Testing of non-standard (innovative) protocols or equipment
  • Comparison of cohorts
  • Randomisation or the use of control groups or placebos
  • Targeted analysis of data involving minority/vulnerable groups whose data is to be separated out of that data collected or analysed as part of the main QA/QI activity
Where one or more of the above triggers apply, prior to commencing the activity a copy of the CALHN QI Brief/audit plan must be submitted to the relevant head(s) of department for review and approval. The approval must then be submitted with the CALHN QI Brief/Audit plan to CALHN Research Services for review. If the activity is determined to be ethically acceptable an ethics exemption will be granted. However, where the activity is determined to require a higher level of oversight a research project submission may be required. For further information about ethical considerations, refer to the National Health and Medical Research Council’s Ethical Considerations in Quality Assurance and Evaluation Activities, or contact CALHN Research Services on 08 7117 2224, or via email at [email protected].

Research GEMS – Submission guidelines

SA Health has implemented a new research application management system called Research Governance and Ethics Management System (Research GEMS) to replace Online Forms for submission of HREA and SSA applications.  Researchers must ensure that all relevant study documentation (eg study protocol, Participant Information and Consent Form etc) are provided via Research GEMS, in addition to completion of the relevant form(s). CALHN GEMS Guideline - Preparing Project Registration and HREA CALHN HREC Submission Covering Letter CALHN GEMS Guideline - Preparing SSA Applications CALHN GEMS Guideline - SSA Part C - Approvals from Departments and Services CALHN Research GEMS Demonstration - BHI Presentation Slides 08 April 2021 

Consultant Surgeon

Low total psoas area as scored in the clinic setting independently predicts mid-term mortality following EVAR

Thurston B, Pena G, Howell S, Cowled P, Fitridge R. Low total psoas area as scored in the clinic setting independently predicts mid-term mortality following EVAR. J Vasc Surg; 2018. Feb;67(2):460-467.

Pubmed Link:  https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/28843791/

Fitness Plus American Society of Anesthesiologists Grade Improve Outcome Prediction After Endovascular Aneurysm Repair

Boult M, Barnes M, Cowled P, Fitridge RA. Fitness Plus American Society of Anesthesiologists Grade Improve Outcome Prediction After Endovascular Aneurysm Repair. ANZ J Surg; 2017. Sep;87(9):682-687.

Pubmed Link:  https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/28691319/

Diabetic foot and lower limb amputations: Underestimated problem with a cost to health system and to the patient

Pena G, Cowled P, Dawson J, Johnson B, Robert Fitridge R. Diabetic foot and lower limb amputations: Underestimated problem with a cost to health system and to the patient. ANZ J Surg; 2018. 88(7-8):666-670.

Pubmed Link:  https://doi.org/10.1111/ans.14436

Global Vascular Guidelines on the Management of Chronic Limb-Threatening Ischemia

Conte MS, Bradbury AW, Kolh P, White JV, Dick F, Fitridge R, Mills JL, Ricco JB, Suresh KR, Murad MH, Aboyans V, Aksoy M, Alexandrescu VA, Armstrong D, Azuma N, Belch J, Bergoeing M, Bjorck M, Chakfé N, Cheng S, Dawson J, Debus ES, et al. GVG Writing Group for the Joint Guidelines of the Society for Vascular Surgery (SVS), European Society for Vascular Surgery (ESVS), and World Federation of Vascular Societies (WFVS). Global Vascular Guidelines on the Management of Chronic Limb-Threatening Ischemia. Eur J Vasc Endovasc Surg; 2019. Jul;58(1S):S1-S109.e33.

Pubmed Link:  https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/31182334/

Micronutrient Status in Diabetic Patients with Foot Ulcers

Pena G, Kuang B, Cowled P, Howell S, Dawson J, Philpot R, Fitridge R. Micronutrient Status in Diabetic Patients with Foot Ulcers. Adv Wound Care ; 2020. Jan 1;9(1):9-15.

Pubmed Link:  https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/31871826/

Adherence to Guideline-Recommended Therapy-Including Supervised Exercise Therapy Referral-Across Peripheral Artery Disease Specialty Clinics: Insights From the International PORTRAIT Registry

Saxon JT, Safley DM, Mena-Hurtado C, Heyligers J, Fitridge R, Shishehbor M, Spertus JA, Gosch K, Patel MR, Smolderen KG. Adherence to Guideline-Recommended Therapy-Including Supervised Exercise Therapy Referral-Across Peripheral Artery Disease Specialty Clinics: Insights From the International PORTRAIT Registry. J Am Heart Assoc; 2020. Feb 4;9(3).

Pubmed Link:  https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/31973609/

Guidelines on Diagnosis, Prognosis, and Management of Peripheral Artery Disease in Patients With Foot Ulcers and Diabetes (IWGDF 2019 Update)

Hinchliffe RJ, Forsythe RO, Apelqvist J, Boyko EJ, Fitridge R, et al on behalf of the IWGDF PAD Working Group. Guidelines on Diagnosis, Prognosis, and Management of Peripheral Artery Disease in Patients With Foot Ulcers and Diabetes (IWGDF 2019 Update). Diabetes Metab Res Rev; 2020. Mar;36 Suppl 1.

Pubmed Link:  https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/31958217/

Postdoctoral Research Coordinator

Research Associate

Clinical Scientist

Prof Catherine Hill: Student Research Projects for 2022
Please read about the Rheumatology Research Group's current projects and contact Chief Medical Scientist [email protected] or Lead Researcher [email protected] to discuss your options further.

Inflammatory mediators in mastitis and lactation insufficiency

Ingman WV, Glynn DJ, Hutchinson MR. Inflammatory mediators in mastitis and lactation insufficiency. Journal of Mammary Gland Biology and Neoplasia; 2014, 19:161–167.

Pubmed Link:  https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24961655

Hormonal modulation of breast cancer gene expression: implications for intrinsic subtyping in premenopausal women

Bernhardt SM, Dasari P, Walsh D, Townsend AR, Price TJ, Ingman WV. Hormonal modulation of breast cancer gene expression: implications for intrinsic subtyping in premenopausal women. Frontiers in Oncology; 2016. 6:241.

Pubmed Link:  https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27896218

CCL2-driven inflammation increases mammary gland stromal density and cancer susceptibility in a transgenic mouse model

Sun X, Glynn DJ, Hodson LJ, Huo C, Britt K, Thompson E, Woolford L, Evdokiou A, Pollard JW, Robertson SA, Ingman WV. CCL2-driven inflammation increases mammary gland stromal density and cancer susceptibility in a transgenic mouse model. Breast Cancer Research; 2017. 19(1):4.

Pubmed Link:  https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/28077158

Dissecting the biology of menstrual cycle-associated breast cancer risk

Atashgaran V, Wrin J, Barry SC, Dasari P, Ingman WV. Dissecting the biology of menstrual cycle-associated breast cancer risk. Frontiers in Oncology; 2016. 6:267.

Pubmed Link:  https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5183603/

InforMD: A new initiative to raise public awareness about breast density

Hugo HJ, Zysk A, Dasari P, Britt K, Hopper JL, Stone J, Thompson EW, Ingman WV. InforMD: A new initiative to raise public awareness about breast density. eCancer;  2018. 12:807.

Pubmed Link:  https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/29492101

The gut microbiome: a new player in breast cancer metastasis

Ingman WV. The gut microbiome: a new player in breast cancer metastasis. Cancer Research; 2019. 79(14):3539-3541.

Pubmed Link:  https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/31308136

Honours and Postgraduate Student Research Projects for 2022
Projects available for honours and postgraduate students, who will be enrolled through the University of South Australia, include:
  • Specific targeting of nanosystems by cutaneous delivery
  • Targeted drug delivery by topical application
  • The efficacy of silver nanoparticle wound therapies
Please contact the Therapeutics Research Centre's Science Director [email protected] and the Centre Manager [email protected] for further information.
Dr Branka Grubor-Bauk: Honours and Postgraduate Student Projects for 2022
The Viral Immunology Group has student projects available for Honours, Masters and PhD studies. The projects cover vaccine development against different viruses such as SARS-CoV-2, Zika, dengue and hepatitis C with options for industry collaborations. We also have clinical/immunology projects in areas of HIV and COVID-19.  Prospective students can contact Branka directly via [email protected] with any further questions.
Dr Scott Clark: Student Research Projects 2022
For more information about these projects please visit Scott's University of Adelaide Researcher Profile:
  • Multimodal prediction of transition to the first psychotic episode
  • Electrophysiology and Response to Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation as biomarkers of cognition and function in mood and psychotic disorders
  • Impact of relapse in schizophrenia on cognition and function: clinical and biological correlates
  • Diagnosis and treatment of clozapine associated myocarditis
Professor John Beltrame: Student Research Projects for 2022
Please also refer to Professor John Beltrame's University of Adelaide Researcher ProfileProject 1 Title: Coronary Angiogram Database of South Australia (CADOSA): Improving health outcomes in patients undergoing coronary angiography Description:Coronary angiography is the clinical benchmark technique in the assessment of coronary artery disease with more than 6,000 performed in South Australia each year. Despite its diagnostic benefits in identifying the presence of coronary disease, its benefit to the patient has been less rigorously studied and will be the focus of this project. CADOSA is an internationally renowned clinical registry incorporating global links with organizations including the American College of Cardiology National Cardiovascular Data Registry and the International Consortium of Health Outcomes Measurement (ICHOM). Projects Available: Honours and HDR Location: Basil Hetzel Institute for Translational Health Research, The Queen Elizabeth Hospital Special Requirements: DCSI Clearance, Vaccinations  The research project is available for semester 1 start though mid-year entry may be considered.   Project 2 Title: Clinical and Vasomotor Studies of Patients with Myocardial Infarction and Non-Obstructive Coronary Arteries (MINOCA) Description: Approximately 5-10% of patients who experience a myocardial infarct do not have significant coronary artery disease, prompting the clinical question of what is the underlying mechanism? This project will (i) integrate with established registry studies to assess clinical outcomes and health status of MINOCA patients and (2) utilise invasive and non-invasive clinical techniques to elucidate potential mechanisms that may be responsible for the myocardial infarct. Projects Available: Honours and HDR Location: Basil Hetzel Institute for Translational Health Research, The Queen Elizabeth Hospital Special Requirements: DCSI Clearance, Vaccinations The research project is available for semester 1 start though mid-year entry may be considered.
Emeritus Professor John Horowitz: Student Research Projects for 2022
Further information about the following research projects can be found on Emertius Professor John Horowitz's University of Adelaide Researcher Profile.
  • Coronary artery spasm
  • Preventing heart damage during cancer chemotherapy
  • Maximising protective effects of BNP in patients with heart failure
  • Variability of anti-aggregatory effects of P2Y12 receptor antagonists: therapeutic adjustments
  • Improving outcomes after takotsubo (broken heart) syndrome
Professor Guy Maddern: Student Research Projects for 2022
Further information about the following research projects can be found on Professor Guy Maddern's University of Adelaide Researcher Profile.
  • Laparoscopic Simulation Skills Program (LSSP)
  • Coaching to Enhance Surgeons’ Non-Technical Skills
  • Developing novel diagnostic tools and preventative therapies for metastatic colorectal cancer
  • Systematic reviews of surgical topics
  • Audit of surgical mortality
  • Health System Research
  • Health Technology Assessment
Identification and characterisation of fibroblast subsets using single cell RNA-sequencing to improve outcomes in patients with rectal cancer
Please contact Dr Eric Smith to discuss this project further. Project description:  Preoperative (neoadjuvant) chemoradiotherapy (nCRT) followed by surgery is widely accepted as the standard of care for patients with rectal cancer.  However, most will endure nCRT without clear benefit because currently there is no way to predict which patients will respond.  Identification of non-responders before treatment would be enormously beneficial.  They would not be at risk of the side effects, and surgery or alternative treatments could be undertaken without unnecessary delay.  Significantly, an improved understanding of the factors associated with nCRT resistance could lead to identification of novel targets for intervention and suggest new avenues of research. This project will investigate the role of cancer associated fibroblasts in the response to nCRT using a combination of innovative and emergent methodologies including single cell RNA-sequencing, multicolour fluorescence immunohistochemistry, and a range of fibroblast-cancer cell co-culture experimental models to identify, characterise and validate novel fibroblast subsets. Projects available for: Honours / HDR / Masters / Mphil Location:  Basil Hetzel Institute, The Queen Elizabeth Hospital Research project start: Semester 1 and 2 Special requirements:  None
Improving Breast Cancer Treatment
Breaking immune tolerance in triple negative breast cancer: Failure of the body's immune system to attack a threat such as a mutated cell is known as immune tolerance, and is one of the key hurdles to overcome in both treating breast cancer and preventing its recurrence. Our laboratory has identified a new biological pathway active in breast cancer involving a protein called C1q, which can be targeted to break this tolerance. The aim of this project is to capitalize on this discovery to develop a new approach to breaking tolerance in triple negative cancer, a very aggressive subtype of breast cancer which is notoriously difficult to treat. Exploring the impact of menstrual cycling on personalised medicine for premenopausal breast cancer patients: Gene expression profiling of breast cancer is a technology increasingly being adopted in the clinic as a personalised medicine approach to tailor treatment to individual patients. However, an underappreciated factor in premenopausal breast cancer diagnosis is that oestrogen and progesterone fluctuate dramatically during the menstrual cycle, and these hormones are likely to affect gene expression. This research aims to determine whether fluctuation in oestrogen and progesterone associated with different stages of the menstrual cycle significantly affects gene expression profiles in breast cancers from premenopausal women. We will examine gene expression profiles in paired biopsy and surgical breast cancer tissue samples taken from women undergoing treatment at The Queen Elizabeth Hospital, and investigate how menstrual cycle stage in the two samples affects breast cancer subtype.
Varenicline and nicotine replacement therapy for smokers admitted to hospital (VANISH)
Risk factors for asthma-related hospitalisation: multi-state case-control study
Qualitative exploration of experiences and perceptions relating to the provision of best-practice care for asthma in South Australia

Clinical Trials Coordinator and Researcher

Safety, Effectiveness of care and Resource use among Australian Hospitals (SAFER Hospitals)
Modern hospital care is fast-paced, complex and expensive. While this has undoubtedly led to better treatments, global concerns exist about the safety and effectiveness of hospital care. The SAFER Hospitals study is a nationwide cohort study that seeks to address this limitation by bringing together linked hospitalisation and outcome data for all public and most private hospitals in Australia. Funded by a Translational Project Grant from the Hospital Research Foundation, SAFER Hospitals will estimate the hospital-wide incidence of serious adverse events, deaths and unplanned hospitalisations following hospital care and how these outcomes vary among hospitals. It will also evaluate the downstream impact by estimating the avoidable costs of these untoward outcomes on the health system.

Senior Research Fellow

Research Adviser

Head of Laboratory Development

Laboratory Assistant

Researcher Showcases

A selection of current and former researchers were asked a series of questions about their previous backgrounds, experiences, highlights and recommendations for working and/or studying at the BHI, TQEH.

BHI Alumni

A selection of current and former researchers were asked a series of questions about their previous backgrounds, experiences, highlights and recommendations for working and/or studying at the BHI, TQEH.

Current Researchers

A selection of current and former researchers were asked a series of questions about their previous backgrounds, experiences, highlights and recommendations for working and/or studying at the BHI, TQEH.
Protein biomarkers for colorectal cancer liver metastasis
Supervisors: Professor Guy Maddern and Dr Kevin Fenix Please email [email protected] to discuss your options further. Colorectal cancer (CRC) is the leading cause of cancer deaths in the Western and developing countries. The incidence and mortality of CRC also increase in young adults. Metastatic dissemination from primary tumour accounts for over 90% of all colorectal cancer death. Adjuvant chemotherapy has been shown to provide a significant improvement in patient survival, however this advantage is not available for all patients who could benefit from it due to inability of current standard method to accurately predict prognosis. Adjuvant chemotherapy for stage II CRC patients is still regarded as controversial. About 25% of stage II CRC patients will develop metastasis after surgical removal of their primary tumour mainly to liver and 50 - 60% of stage III CRC patients will develop metastasis. The overall survival rate for stage II CRC patients five years after surgery is approximately 70 - 80% and that for stage III patients is 30 - 60%. Questions remaining to be answered include which patients will benefit from adjuvant chemotherapy and what chemotherapy to use to give most benefit for the patients. Classic disease staging, which is currently the key prognostic indicator for CRC, includes degree of lymph node involvement. Recovery and evaluation of lymph nodes in the resection specimen are, however, influenced by the method and quality of surgical resection, quality of pathologic evaluation, tumour related factors and patient factors. Variation in the assessment of lymph node status could lead to under-staging and as a result a falsely node-negative patient may not receive the potential benefit of adjuvant therapy. It is well recognised that staging by light microscopy alone is not sufficiently accurate to predict spread as significant variation with respect to clinical outcome exists within currently used stages. Carcinoembryonic Antigen (CEA) has been used to predict CRC recurrence for almost 40 years. However, serum CEA has a poor diagnostic accuracy. There is therefore urgent need for histological staging to be supported by molecular profiling of tumours to provide additional accuracy in stratifying patients for better disease management and ultimately improved survival. We have identified protein candidates using proteomic approaches and currently collaboratively working with Callaghan Innovation New Zealand to generate a prototype diagnostic test. Current projects for Honours degree students include evaluation of protein biomarker candidates on a larger number of clinical samples and to determine the functions of the proteins on cancer progression and development using cell culture techniques. We have fresh frozen normal colon, colon tumour, normal liver and liver metastasis and blood of more than 500 patients and some of them were from matched patients accompanied by complete clinical parameters. In addition we also have tissue microarray of more than 250 samples. This resource is hardly found elsewhere. New projects can be discussed, designed and established to identify additional biomarkers for colorectal cancer for Higher Degree Research Student Projects.