Search Results for:

2020 BHI Invited Speaker Seminar Series commences

Professor John Spertus, cardiologist and the Lauer/Missouri Endowed Chair and Professor of Medicine at the University of Missouri-Kansas City, where he serves as the Clinical Director of Outcomes Research at Saint Luke’s Mid America Heart Institute, kicked off the BHI Invited Speaker Seminar Series yesterday.

SA Department for Innovation & Skills: Research, Commercialisation & Startup Fund (RCSF) – Strategic Research Initiatives (Stream1)

The Research, Commercialisation and Start-up Fund (RCSF) supports collaboration between businesses, researchers and universities to solve industrial problems, commercialise new products and services, attract investment into research and research infrastructure into the State and encourage the establishment and growth of start-ups.

SA’s Chief Scientist visits the Basil Hetzel Institute

South Australia's Chief Scientist Professor Caroline McMillen met with the Director of Research at The Queen Elizabeth Hospital, Professor Guy Maddern, and the Director of Research for the Central Adelaide Local Health Network, Professor John Beltrame, and toured the Basil Hetzel Institute on Monday 29th April.

Sarah and Zelalem awarded prizes at Florey Postgraduate Research Conference

Congratulations to Basil Hetzel Institute PhD students Sarah Bernhardt (Breast Biology and Cancer Unit) and Zelalem Mekonnen (Virology Group) for being awarded the Adelaide Medical School Prize and Research and Business Partnerships Prize (sponsored by CMAX) respectively at The University of Adelaide Florey Postgraduate Research Conference.

ASMR Ross Wishart Memorial Award won by Dr Katharina Richter

14.06.20180 comments

In the news: TQEH gastroenterologist Dr Sam Costello talks about BiomeBank – Australia’s first public stool bank

21.03.20180 comments

In the news: Prof PJ Wormald and Dr Katharina Richter, ENT Surgery

07.03.20180 comments

SA Winner of Fresh Science is Dr Katharina Richter, ENT Surgery

06.03.20180 comments

In the news: Dr Anupam Gupta, TQEH Rehabilitation Consultant

06.03.20180 comments

In the news: Professor Tim Price, TQEH oncologist and researcher

21.02.20180 comments

Two consecutive TQEH Research Days held in 2017

20.10.20170 comments

Spring graduation for PhD students from the BHI

19.09.20170 comments

Dean’s Commendation awarded to Dr Katharina Richter

25.07.20170 comments

BHI Winning News: THRF grant recipients summarise their project aims

06.07.20170 comments

Dr Pallave Dasari named as one of the first “Superstars of STEM”

04.07.20170 comments

THRF announce $2.7 million of funding to BHI and TQEH

15.06.20170 comments

Congratulations to two BHI researchers for winning Virology Conference Awards

15.06.20170 comments

Dr Bill Panagopoulos wins the ASMR Ross Wishart Memorial Award

13.06.20170 comments

SBS TV’s Insight ‘Gut Feeling’ with TQEH Gastroenterologist Dr Sam Costello

07.06.20170 comments

Dr Bill Panagopoulos is a finalist in the ASMR Ross Wishart Memorial Award

06.06.20170 comments

Dean’s Commendation awarded to Dr Dijana Miljkovic

03.05.20170 comments

Jason Gummow receives University award for thesis excellence

15.02.20170 comments

High Commissioner of the Republic of Botswana visits the Virology Group

07.12.20160 comments

Frontline attack against HIV infection is closer to reality

22.11.20160 comments

The 25th Anniversary of TQEH Research Day was a great success!

21.10.20160 comments

Clinical Practice Unit researchers are finalists in the 2016 SA Health Awards

19.10.20160 comments

Congratulations to three PhD students – Bill, Sven & Abdul

04.10.20160 comments

Congratulations to 3MT People’s Choice Winner – Katharina Richter

15.09.20160 comments

Final BHI ‘Talking Heads’ Seminar for 2016

08.09.20160 comments

Results of pilot NACIAM study presented in Rome

30.08.20160 comments

Postdoctoral researcher Dr Amy Holmes is short listed for LUSH prize

25.08.20160 comments

BHI researchers discuss their work on 5AA radio today

18.08.20160 comments

PhD student Katharina Richter is in the University of Adelaide 3MT Final

11.08.20160 comments

SA Science Excellence Awards – Dr Kristin Carson is a finalist

11.08.20160 comments

Visit the BHI booth at Science Alive! this weekend

04.08.20160 comments

Associate Professor Wendy Ingman receives an award from the University of Adelaide

09.06.20160 comments

ASMR Gala Dinner: THRF sponsors 10 BHI students to attend

07.06.20160 comments

Professor PJ Wormald and the phage therapy trial targeted at antibiotic-resistant “superbugs”

07.06.20160 comments

PhD student Cher-Rin Chong is flying off to Oxford for a prestigious post-doc!

26.05.20160 comments

PhD student Dijana Miljkovic’s research in ‘The Lead’ article

10.05.20160 comments

Dr Basil Hetzel AC one of 5 prominent nonagenarians to welcome the Queen into their exclusive club!

21.04.20160 comments

PhD student Khamis Tomusange story on ABC online

12.04.20160 comments

Two PhD students are Finalists in the Channel 9 Young Achiever Awards

17.02.20160 comments

Professor John Beltrame on Channel 9 news

16.12.20150 comments

Coast FM radio interview with Bill Panagopoulos

16.12.20150 comments

Low total psoas area as scored in the clinic setting independently predicts mid-term mortality following EVAR

Thurston B, Pena G, Howell S, Cowled P, Fitridge R. Low total psoas area as scored in the clinic setting independently predicts mid-term mortality following EVAR. J Vasc Surg; 2018. Feb;67(2):460-467.

Pubmed Link:  https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/28843791/

Fitness Plus American Society of Anesthesiologists Grade Improve Outcome Prediction After Endovascular Aneurysm Repair

Boult M, Barnes M, Cowled P, Fitridge RA. Fitness Plus American Society of Anesthesiologists Grade Improve Outcome Prediction After Endovascular Aneurysm Repair. ANZ J Surg; 2017. Sep;87(9):682-687.

Pubmed Link:  https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/28691319/

Diabetic foot and lower limb amputations: Underestimated problem with a cost to health system and to the patient

Pena G, Cowled P, Dawson J, Johnson B, Robert Fitridge R. Diabetic foot and lower limb amputations: Underestimated problem with a cost to health system and to the patient. ANZ J Surg; 2018. 88(7-8):666-670.

Pubmed Link:  https://doi.org/10.1111/ans.14436

Global Vascular Guidelines on the Management of Chronic Limb-Threatening Ischemia

Conte MS, Bradbury AW, Kolh P, White JV, Dick F, Fitridge R, Mills JL, Ricco JB, Suresh KR, Murad MH, Aboyans V, Aksoy M, Alexandrescu VA, Armstrong D, Azuma N, Belch J, Bergoeing M, Bjorck M, Chakfé N, Cheng S, Dawson J, Debus ES, et al. GVG Writing Group for the Joint Guidelines of the Society for Vascular Surgery (SVS), European Society for Vascular Surgery (ESVS), and World Federation of Vascular Societies (WFVS). Global Vascular Guidelines on the Management of Chronic Limb-Threatening Ischemia. Eur J Vasc Endovasc Surg; 2019. Jul;58(1S):S1-S109.e33.

Pubmed Link:  https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/31182334/

Micronutrient Status in Diabetic Patients with Foot Ulcers

Pena G, Kuang B, Cowled P, Howell S, Dawson J, Philpot R, Fitridge R. Micronutrient Status in Diabetic Patients with Foot Ulcers. Adv Wound Care ; 2020. Jan 1;9(1):9-15.

Pubmed Link:  https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/31871826/

Adherence to Guideline-Recommended Therapy-Including Supervised Exercise Therapy Referral-Across Peripheral Artery Disease Specialty Clinics: Insights From the International PORTRAIT Registry

Saxon JT, Safley DM, Mena-Hurtado C, Heyligers J, Fitridge R, Shishehbor M, Spertus JA, Gosch K, Patel MR, Smolderen KG. Adherence to Guideline-Recommended Therapy-Including Supervised Exercise Therapy Referral-Across Peripheral Artery Disease Specialty Clinics: Insights From the International PORTRAIT Registry. J Am Heart Assoc; 2020. Feb 4;9(3).

Pubmed Link:  https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/31973609/

Guidelines on Diagnosis, Prognosis, and Management of Peripheral Artery Disease in Patients With Foot Ulcers and Diabetes (IWGDF 2019 Update)

Hinchliffe RJ, Forsythe RO, Apelqvist J, Boyko EJ, Fitridge R, et al on behalf of the IWGDF PAD Working Group. Guidelines on Diagnosis, Prognosis, and Management of Peripheral Artery Disease in Patients With Foot Ulcers and Diabetes (IWGDF 2019 Update). Diabetes Metab Res Rev; 2020. Mar;36 Suppl 1.

Pubmed Link:  https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/31958217/

Postdoctoral Research Coordinator

Research Associate

Clinical Scientist

Inflammatory mediators in mastitis and lactation insufficiency

Ingman WV, Glynn DJ, Hutchinson MR. Inflammatory mediators in mastitis and lactation insufficiency. Journal of Mammary Gland Biology and Neoplasia; 2014, 19:161–167.

Pubmed Link:  https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24961655

Hormonal modulation of breast cancer gene expression: implications for intrinsic subtyping in premenopausal women

Bernhardt SM, Dasari P, Walsh D, Townsend AR, Price TJ, Ingman WV. Hormonal modulation of breast cancer gene expression: implications for intrinsic subtyping in premenopausal women. Frontiers in Oncology; 2016. 6:241.

Pubmed Link:  https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27896218

CCL2-driven inflammation increases mammary gland stromal density and cancer susceptibility in a transgenic mouse model

Sun X, Glynn DJ, Hodson LJ, Huo C, Britt K, Thompson E, Woolford L, Evdokiou A, Pollard JW, Robertson SA, Ingman WV. CCL2-driven inflammation increases mammary gland stromal density and cancer susceptibility in a transgenic mouse model. Breast Cancer Research; 2017. 19(1):4.

Pubmed Link:  https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/28077158

Dissecting the biology of menstrual cycle-associated breast cancer risk

Atashgaran V, Wrin J, Barry SC, Dasari P, Ingman WV. Dissecting the biology of menstrual cycle-associated breast cancer risk. Frontiers in Oncology; 2016. 6:267.

Pubmed Link:  https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5183603/

InforMD: A new initiative to raise public awareness about breast density

Hugo HJ, Zysk A, Dasari P, Britt K, Hopper JL, Stone J, Thompson EW, Ingman WV. InforMD: A new initiative to raise public awareness about breast density. eCancer;  2018. 12:807.

Pubmed Link:  https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/29492101

The gut microbiome: a new player in breast cancer metastasis

Ingman WV. The gut microbiome: a new player in breast cancer metastasis. Cancer Research; 2019. 79(14):3539-3541.

Pubmed Link:  https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/31308136

Honours and Postgraduate Student Research Projects for 2020
Projects available for honours and postgraduate students, who will be enrolled through the University of South Australia, include:
  • Specific targeting of nanosystems by cutaneous delivery
  • Targeted drug delivery by topical application
  • The efficacy of silver nanoparticle wound therapies
Please contact the Therapeutics Research Centre's Science Director michael.roberts@unisa.edu.au and the Centre Manager lorraine.mackenzie@unisa.edu.au for further information.
Honours and Postgraduate Student Projects for 2020
The Viral Immunology Group has a number of student projects available for potential Honours, Masters and PhD studies. The chosen project will cover vaccine development in the areas of HIV, Zika virus or Hepatitis C with options for industry collaborations. Please contact branka.grubor@adelaide.edu.au if you have any further questions.
Dr Scott Clark: Student Research Projects 2020
For more information about these projects please visit Scott's University of Adelaide Researcher Profile:
  • Multimodal prediction of transition to the first psychotic episode
  • Electrophysiology and Response to Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation as biomarkers of cognition and function in mood and psychotic disorders
  • Impact of relapse in schizophrenia on cognition and function: clinical and biological correlates
  • Diagnosis and treatment of clozapine associated myocarditis
Professor John Beltrame: Student Research Projects for 2020
Project 1 Title: Coronary Angiogram Database of South Australia (CADOSA): Improving health outcomes in patients undergoing coronary angiography Description:Coronary angiography is the clinical benchmark technique in the assessment of coronary artery disease with more than 6,000 performed in South Australia each year. Despite its diagnostic benefits in identifying the presence of coronary disease, its benefit to the patient has been less rigorously studied and will be the focus of this project. CADOSA is an internationally renowned clinical registry incorporating global links with organizations including the American College of Cardiology National Cardiovascular Data Registry and the International Consortium of Health Outcomes Measurement (ICHOM). Projects Available: Honours and HDR Location: Basil Hetzel Institute for Translational Health Research, The Queen Elizabeth Hospital Special Requirements: DCSI Clearance, Vaccinations  The research project is available for semester 1 start though mid-year entry may be considered.   Project 2 Title: Clinical and Vasomotor Studies of Patients with Myocardial Infarction and Non-Obstructive Coronary Arteries (MINOCA) Description: Approximately 5-10% of patients who experience a myocardial infarct do not have significant coronary artery disease, prompting the clinical question of what is the underlying mechanism? This project will (i) integrate with established registry studies to assess clinical outcomes and health status of MINOCA patients and (2) utilise invasive and non-invasive clinical techniques to elucidate potential mechanisms that may be responsible for the myocardial infarct. Projects Available: Honours and HDR Location: Basil Hetzel Institute for Translational Health Research, The Queen Elizabeth Hospital Special Requirements: DCSI Clearance, Vaccinations The research project is available for semester 1 start though mid-year entry may be considered.
Emeritus Professor John Horowitz: Student Research Projects for 2020
Further information about the following research projects can be found on Emertius Professor John Horowitz's University of Adelaide Researcher Profile.
  • Coronary artery spasm
  • Preventing heart damage during cancer chemotherapy
  • Maximising protective effects of BNP in patients with heart failure
  • Variability of anti-aggregatory effects of P2Y12 receptor antagonists: therapeutic adjustments
  • Improving outcomes after takotsubo (broken heart) syndrome
Professor Guy Maddern: Student Research Projects for 2020
Further information about the following research projects can be found on Professor Guy Maddern's University of Adelaide Researcher Profile.
  • Laparoscopic Simulation Skills Program (LSSP)
  • Coaching to Enhance Surgeons’ Non-Technical Skills
  • Developing novel diagnostic tools and preventative therapies for metastatic colorectal cancer
  • Systematic reviews of surgical topics
  • Audit of surgical mortality
  • Health System Research
  • Health Technology Assessment
Identification and characterisation of fibroblast subsets using single cell RNA-sequencing to improve outcomes in patients with rectal cancer
Please contact Dr Eric Smith to discuss this project further. Project description:  Preoperative (neoadjuvant) chemoradiotherapy (nCRT) followed by surgery is widely accepted as the standard of care for patients with rectal cancer.  However, most will endure nCRT without clear benefit because currently there is no way to predict which patients will respond.  Identification of non-responders before treatment would be enormously beneficial.  They would not be at risk of the side effects, and surgery or alternative treatments could be undertaken without unnecessary delay.  Significantly, an improved understanding of the factors associated with nCRT resistance could lead to identification of novel targets for intervention and suggest new avenues of research. This project will investigate the role of cancer associated fibroblasts in the response to nCRT using a combination of innovative and emergent methodologies including single cell RNA-sequencing, multicolour fluorescence immunohistochemistry, and a range of fibroblast-cancer cell co-culture experimental models to identify, characterise and validate novel fibroblast subsets. Projects available for: Honours / HDR / Masters / Mphil Location:  Basil Hetzel Institute, The Queen Elizabeth Hospital Research project start: Semester 1 and 2 Special requirements:  None
Mastitis and Lactation Insufficiency
Lactation mastitis is an inflammatory breast disease affecting 17-27% of Australian breastfeeding women that causes pain, fever and low milk supply. The challenges posed by this disease lead many women to use supplementary formula, or cease breastfeeding altogether leaving their infants at increased risk of respiratory and gastrointestinal diseases as babies, and non-communicable diseases including heart disease, obesity, diabetes, cancer, allergies, asthma, mental illness and chronic lung, liver and renal diseases as both children and adults. Our recent research has suggested that macrophages play a role in development of this disease. Our current research pursues new knowledge in how disease state develop in the breast. We explore revolutionary new concepts of how immune cells function in the breast, and how these cells affect breast disease development.
Improving Breast Cancer Treatment
Breaking immune tolerance in triple negative breast cancer: Failure of the body's immune system to attack a threat such as a mutated cell is known as immune tolerance, and is one of the key hurdles to overcome in both treating breast cancer and preventing its recurrence. Our laboratory has identified a new biological pathway active in breast cancer involving a protein called C1q, which can be targeted to break this tolerance. The aim of this project is to capitalize on this discovery to develop a new approach to breaking tolerance in triple negative cancer, a very aggressive subtype of breast cancer which is notoriously difficult to treat. Exploring the impact of menstrual cycling on personalised medicine for premenopausal breast cancer patients: Gene expression profiling of breast cancer is a technology increasingly being adopted in the clinic as a personalised medicine approach to tailor treatment to individual patients. However, an underappreciated factor in premenopausal breast cancer diagnosis is that oestrogen and progesterone fluctuate dramatically during the menstrual cycle, and these hormones are likely to affect gene expression. This research aims to determine whether fluctuation in oestrogen and progesterone associated with different stages of the menstrual cycle significantly affects gene expression profiles in breast cancers from premenopausal women. We will examine gene expression profiles in paired biopsy and surgical breast cancer tissue samples taken from women undergoing treatment at The Queen Elizabeth Hospital, and investigate how menstrual cycle stage in the two samples affects breast cancer subtype.
Breast Cancer Risk and Prevention
Breast cancer places an incredible burden on Australian women. Every year, around 18,000 Australian women are diagnosed with breast cancer alone - a disease that devastates women's lives and is often fatal. If we are to prevent and treat breast cancer, we must better understand how the disease develops. Breast density (also known as mammographic density) is the percentage of white and bright regions on a mammogram. Breast density is not related to how breasts look or feel and can only be assessed by mammogram. Forty three percent of women have "Heterogenously Dense" or "Extremely Dense" breasts, which together are termed "high breast density". High breast density is both an independent risk factor for breast cancer and masks cancers on a mammogram. Combined, these two distinct phenomena lead to increased incidence, delayed diagnosis, more aggressive tumours, and a 90% increased risk of breast cancer-associated death in women with high breast density. There is exciting potential for breast density to become a widespread health assessment tool, used to identify the women most at risk of breast cancer in order to intervene early and reduce that risk. Our research is the first to demonstrate a causal role for immune system signalling in breast density and the associated cancer risk. Using a unique human biobank of paired high and low density breast tissue samples, together with transgenic mouse models, we demonstrated that pro-inflammatory protein C-C Motif Chemokine Ligand 2 (CCL2) is a biological driver of both high breast density and increased risk of cancer. This study opens the door for new approaches to reduce breast cancer risk through use of anti-inflammatory drugs in women with dense breasts.
Varenicline and nicotine replacement therapy for smokers admitted to hospital (VANISH)
Risk factors for asthma-related hospitalisation: multi-state case-control study
Qualitative exploration of experiences and perceptions relating to the provision of best-practice care for asthma in South Australia

Clinical Trials Coordinator and Researcher

Safety, Effectiveness of care and Resource use among Australian Hospitals (SAFER Hospitals)
Modern hospital care is fast-paced, complex and expensive. While this has undoubtedly led to better treatments, global concerns exist about the safety and effectiveness of hospital care. The SAFER Hospitals study is a nationwide cohort study that seeks to address this limitation by bringing together linked hospitalisation and outcome data for all public and most private hospitals in Australia. Funded by a Translational Project Grant from the Hospital Research Foundation, SAFER Hospitals will estimate the hospital-wide incidence of serious adverse events, deaths and unplanned hospitalisations following hospital care and how these outcomes vary among hospitals. It will also evaluate the downstream impact by estimating the avoidable costs of these untoward outcomes on the health system.

Senior Research Fellow

Research Adviser

Head of Laboratory Development

Laboratory Assistant

Researcher Showcases

A selection of current and former researchers were asked a series of questions about their previous backgrounds, experiences, highlights and recommendations for working and/or studying at the BHI, TQEH.

BHI Alumni

A selection of current and former researchers were asked a series of questions about their previous backgrounds, experiences, highlights and recommendations for working and/or studying at the BHI, TQEH.

Current Researchers

A selection of current and former researchers were asked a series of questions about their previous backgrounds, experiences, highlights and recommendations for working and/or studying at the BHI, TQEH.
Protein biomarkers for colorectal cancer liver metastasis
Supervisors: Professor Guy Maddern and Dr Chandra Kirana Please email chandra.kirana@adelaide.edu.au to discuss your options further! Colorectal cancer (CRC) is the leading cause of cancer deaths in the Western and developing countries. The incidence and mortality of CRC also increase in young adults. Metastatic dissemination from primary tumour accounts for over 90% of all colorectal cancer death. Adjuvant chemotherapy has been shown to provide a significant improvement in patient survival, however this advantage is not available for all patients who could benefit from it due to inability of current standard method to accurately predict prognosis. Adjuvant chemotherapy for stage II CRC patients is still regarded as controversial. About 25% of stage II CRC patients will develop metastasis after surgical removal of their primary tumour mainly to liver and 50 - 60% of stage III CRC patients will develop metastasis. The overall survival rate for stage II CRC patients five years after surgery is approximately 70 - 80% and that for stage III patients is 30 - 60%. Questions remaining to be answered include which patients will benefit from adjuvant chemotherapy and what chemotherapy to use to give most benefit for the patients. Classic disease staging, which is currently the key prognostic indicator for CRC, includes degree of lymph node involvement. Recovery and evaluation of lymph nodes in the resection specimen are, however, influenced by the method and quality of surgical resection, quality of pathologic evaluation, tumour related factors and patient factors. Variation in the assessment of lymph node status could lead to under-staging and as a result a falsely node-negative patient may not receive the potential benefit of adjuvant therapy. It is well recognised that staging by light microscopy alone is not sufficiently accurate to predict spread as significant variation with respect to clinical outcome exists within currently used stages. Carcinoembryonic Antigen (CEA) has been used to predict CRC recurrence for almost 40 years. However, serum CEA has a poor diagnostic accuracy. There is therefore urgent need for histological staging to be supported by molecular profiling of tumours to provide additional accuracy in stratifying patients for better disease management and ultimately improved survival. We have identified protein candidates using proteomic approaches and currently collaboratively working with Callaghan Innovation New Zealand to generate a prototype diagnostic test. Current projects for Honours degree students include evaluation of protein biomarker candidates on a larger number of clinical samples and to determine the functions of the proteins on cancer progression and development using cell culture techniques. We have fresh frozen normal colon, colon tumour, normal liver and liver metastasis and blood of more than 500 patients and some of them were from matched patients accompanied by complete clinical parameters. In addition we also have tissue microarray of more than 250 samples. This resource is hardly found elsewhere. New projects can be discussed, designed and established to identify additional biomarkers for colorectal cancer for Higher Degree Research Student Projects.

Low/Negligible Risk (LNR) Applications

The NHMRC National Statement on Ethical Conduct in Human Research (2007) defines low risk research as “research where the only foreseeable risk is one of discomfort”.  Discomfort may include minor side-effects of medication, discomfort related to measuring blood pressure or anxiety induced by an interview.  Where the risk, even if unlikely, is more serious than discomfort, the research is not low risk. For applications where either:
  • NALHN is the only SA Health site involved, or
  • NALHN and CALHN are the only SA Health sites involved
Submission is via the Low/Negligible Risk Ethics and Governance Application (LNREGA) Form Low/Negligible Risk Ethics and Governance Application Form Low/Negligible Risk Application Guidelines Submission for ethical review is via email to Health.CALHNResearchLNR@sa.gov.au Submission for governance (site) review is via email to HealthNALHNRGO@sa.gov.au For studies involving other SA Health or public health sites submission is via the Online Forms system - see the Site Specific Application tab above.

Senior Research Officer

Surgical Registrar and Postgraduate Student

Higher Degree Research Project: Defects in physiological regulation of platelet aggregation: implications in the setting of potential coronary stenting
Supervised by Dr Y Chirkov and Professor J Horowitz We are studying regulation of blood clot formation in patients with different cardiac conditions. Blood clots cause heart attacks and strokes. Clot formation can be prevented with special medications (eg. clopidogrel or ticagrelor), which are used clinically to prevent thrombosis. Our research is aiming to identify a reason for the frequently occurring less-than-expected response to these medications. We are focusing on platelets because the starting point for blood clot is platelet aggregation. Autacoids, naturally occurring within the organism (e.g. nitric oxide and prostacyclin) which are supposed to control the normal function of platelets, stop working properly in patients with cardio-vascular diseases. It turns out that the platelet adenylate cyclase system is particularly important in predicting responses to clopidogrel and related drugs, implying that defective adenylate cyclase signalling may be the basis for poor patient responses to this class of drugs. We are trying to work out what is going wrong with this regulation and how it could be restored.
Higher Degree Research Project: The heart in stress: Tako-Tsubo cardiomyopathy
Supervised by Dr TH Nguyen and Professor J Horowitz Tako-Tsubo syndrome (TS) occurs mainly in ageing women as a dysfunctional, inflammatory response of the heart to adrenaline. We have partially characterised the chemical signal transduction pathway in TS, and now seek to evaluate potential therapeutic avenues, using intact animal models, essentially to characterize the impairment in post-receptor signaling.
Higher Degree Research Project: Impact of B-type natriuretic peptide (BNP) on stabilisation and function of the myocardium
Supervised by: Dr S Liu, Dr Y Chirkov and Professor J Horowitz We have recently shown that BNP exerts important anti-inflammatory effects, by stabilising white blood cells and diminishing superoxide production. We wish to determine whether this results in limitation of inflammatory change within the heart, and whether this anti-inflammatory effect of BNP is lost in acute heart failure.
Honours Project: The “Resilient Heart” Project: towards better understanding of anthracycline-induced cardiac injury
Supervised by: Dr S Liu and Professor J Horowitz Chemotherapy-induced cardiotoxicity is an emerging cause of heart failure that could add millions more to the healthcare budget. Currently, there are over 400,000 cancer survivors in Australia and that number is expected to continuously increase. Given that virtually all of the drugs concerned are cardiac toxic, this advance has come at the cost of increased risk of symptomatic or fatal heart failure. Doxorubicin, a member of the anthracycline family, is a well-known chemotherapeutic agent which is used in treatment of a wide variety of cancers. The successful use of doxorubicin has been hampered by toxicities such as hematopoietic suppression, nausea, vomiting, extravasation, and alopecia, yet the most feared side-effect is cardiotoxicity. The planned study will utilize technology which is already established in our laboratory to establish the determinants of extent of toxic effect of doxorubicin compared with those of other more recently developed antineoplastic drugs. The technology will utilize human myocardial cell grown in culture, and will quantitate the transition from complete cell viability through apoptosis to eventual necrosis. The results will help in the development of methods to develop cardiac-safe anticancer therapeutics.
Honours Project: Impaired platelet autacoidal signalling in patients with coronary vasospasm
Supervised by: Dr Y Chirkov, Dr TH Nguyen and Professor J Horowitz Angina pectoris is a common and debilitating problem in Western society, usually resulting from narrowing of coronary arteries. However, in a substantial minority of patients, spasm of the large or small coronary arteries is the cause of pain. While this condition can be treated symptomatically, there is no available cure, and many patients have poor quality of life because of frequent and recurrent episodes of pain. We are currently evaluating integrity of signalling pathways related to anti-aggregatory autacoids (e.g. nitric oxide and prostacyclin) in coronary spasm patients, with encouraging pilot results. These ongoing studies may lead to the development of better treatments for this condition.

also refer to p100 of BHI Research Report 2017

also refer to p95 of BHI Research Report 2017

Clinical Pharmacology Research Group’s Publications and Patents

Please visit the PUBLICATIONS page on Associate Professor Betty Sallustio’s University of Adelaide Researcher Profile.

PATENTS

March 2014: Provisional patent application: “New Indications for (-)-Perhexiline”. BC Sallustio, G Licari, P Milner, P Druzgula

September 2013: Uses of (-)-Perhexiline. International Patent Corporation Treaty (PCT) Patent Application #PCT/AU2013/001008 (Filed 5 September 2013).

September 2012: Sallustio BC, Milne RW, Licari G and Somogyi AA. Use of Enantiomers of Perhexiline. Provisional Patent Application #2012903850, Australia (Lodged Sep 5, 2012).

September 2012: Sallustio BC, Milne RW, Licari G and Somogyi AA. Use of Enantiomers of Perhexiline. Provisional Patent Application #61697214, USA (Lodged Sep 5, 2012).

Individualising Transplantation Therapy

The success of kidney transplantation depends largely on preventing rejection of the new organ, using a combination of immunosuppressant drugs. These drugs have narrow therapeutic indices and can cause renal, gastrointestinal or haematological toxicity. Due to significant variability in their elimination from the body, doses are currently individualised by targeting therapeutic concentrations in the blood. Despite this, rejection and toxicity still occur. Our research focuses on understanding immunosuppressant distribution into lymphocytes (the mediators of rejection) and renal tissue (a major site of toxicity), as a means of better predicting individual risk of rejection and damage to the transplanted organ.

Metabolic Treatments for Heart Disease and Cancer
Altered cellular energy metabolism is an underlying feature of both heart disease and cancer. In heart disease, maladaptive changes in energy utilisation and storage contribute to a decline in myocardial function and structural remodelling. In cancer cells, changes in energy utilisation allow increased cell survival, replication and metastasis. In addition, some cancer chemotherapy agents cause myocardial damage. Therefore, it is possible that drugs designed for treatment of heart disease, may also be useful adjunct therapies in cancer. PhD and Honours projects are available in two broad research areas:
  1. Investigating the efficacy of new myocardial metabolic agents in the treatment of heart failure and ischaemic heart disease.
  2. Developing new therapies for chemotherapy-induced myocardial toxicity in cancer patients.
 

Senior Technical Officer

Senior Research Consultant (GIS)

Science Director

Senior Analyst

Nanotechnologist

Pharmaceutical Technologist

Formulations Technologist

Centre Manager

Senior Research Consultant

Trajectories of Response to Aripiprazole Maintena Study (TRAMS)

This study investigates the impact of Aripiprazole depot for treatment of schizophrenia and schizoaffective disorder. The study is funded by Lunbeck, with the main aim of identifying predictors of treatment outcome. The study involves an assessment of psychopathology, cognitive and general function along with blood sampling and a brief physical examination.

Interested participants should contact the research team.

email: research.psychiatry@adelaide.edu.au

Ph: +61 8 8313 7676

Why study at the BHI?

Researcher Showcases - Read about why current and former BHI, TQEH researchers recommend the BHI as a place to work and/or study. Here are 10 reasons why we think you should consider undertaking honours and/or postgraduate research at the BHI, TQEH:
  1. excellent research groups, each of which have close links with clinicians at The Queen Elizabeth Hospital (TQEH)
  2. excellent research facilities
  3. active seminar program with both internal and external speakers, and the opportunity to present your results at weekly postgraduate student seminars
  4. The Hospital Research Foundation (THRF) funding support – scholarships, equipment, networking and professional development opportunities (including travel funding, payment for posters, media and communications training, attending various events). THRF has been supporting research at TQEH for over 50 years.
  5. THRF media & communications support – opportunity to participate in community engagement activities and media appearances coordinated by THRF.
  6. TQEH Research Expo – held annually in October, students present their research results with generous student prizes awarded in multiple categories
  7. Student representatives – opportunity to be one of 3 student representatives (one from each floor level of the BHI) and be an active member of the BHI Management Committee
  8. Regular in-house social activities, often run by student representatives, help make the BHI a friendly, helpful and collaborative place in which do do research.
  9. Easy access via public transport (train, bus) and car, with free street-parking nearby
  10. Electric bikes are available for all BHI researchers to use (eg. to attend meetings in city)
 

Rising incidence of early-onset colorectal cancer in Australia over two decades: report and review

Young JP, Win AK, Rosty C, Flight I, Roder D, Young GP, Frank O, Suthers GK, Hewett PJ, Ruszkiewicz A, Hauben E, Adelstein BA, Parry S, Townsend A, Hardingham JE, Price TJ. Rising incidence of early-onset colorectal cancer in Australia over two decades: report and review. J. Gastroenterol. Hepatol.; 2015. 30(1): 6-13.

Hepatitis C virus drives the pathogenesis of hepatocellular carcinoma: from immune evasion to carcinogenesis

Canavese M, Wijesundara D, Maddern GJ, Grubor-Bauk B, Hauben E . Hepatitis C virus drives the pathogenesis of hepatocellular carcinoma: from immune evasion to carcinogenesis. Clin. Transl. Immunology; 2016. 5(10): 101-105.

Discordant frequencies of tissue-resident and circulating CD180-negative B cells in chronic rhinosinusitis

Miljkovic D, Ou J, Kirana C, Hulse KE, Hauben E, Psaltis A, Wormald PJ, Vreugde S . Discordant frequencies of tissue-resident and circulating CD180-negative B cells in chronic rhinosinusitis. Int. Forum Allergy Rhinol.; 2017. 7(6):609-614.

Biology and therapeutic implications of VEGF-A splice isoforms and single-nucleotide polymorphisms in colorectal cancer

Canavese M, Ngo DT, Maddern GJ, Hardingham JE, Price TJ, Hauben E . Biology and therapeutic implications of VEGF-A splice isoforms and single-nucleotide polymorphisms in colorectal cancer. Int. J. Cancer; 2017. 140(10): 2183-2191.

Soluble HLA-G is a differential prognostic marker in sequential colorectal cancer disease stages

Kirana C, Ruszkiewicz A, Stubbs RS, Hardingham JE, Hewett PJ, Maddern GJ, Hauben E. Soluble HLA-G is a differential prognostic marker in sequential colorectal cancer disease stages. Int J Cancer; 2017. 140 (11): 2577-2586.

Honours Student Projects – liver metastasis
  • Development of prognostic biomarkers of metastatic colorectal cancer.
  • HLA-G as predictive biomarker of response to therapy.
  • Imaging biomarkers for prediction of metastatic risk in colorectal cancer patients.
Higher Degree Research Student Projects – liver metastasis
  • Characterisation of the immune cell compartment in liver metastasis.
  • Development of targeted nanoparticles as preventative therapy for liver metastasis.

National Health and Medical Research Council (NHMRC)

The HREC (TQEH/LMH/MH) is constituted and functions in accordance with the NHMRC National Statement on Ethical Conduct in Human Research (2007) The National Statement consists of a series of guidelines made in accordance with the National Health and Medical Research Council Act 1992. It is intended for use by:
  • any researcher conducting research with human participants;
  • any member of an ethical review body reviewing that research;
  • those involved in research governance; and
  • potential research participants.
The National Statement is developed jointly by the National Health and Medical Research Council, the Australian Research Council and Universities Australia. Researchers are encouraged to read the National Statement prior to submitting their application for review. Researchers are also encouraged to use the NHMRC Standardised Participant Information Consent Forms available here.
Molecular Oncology Colorectal Cancer Research Group

Research Projects suitable for Honours and Postgraduate research students

For more information about these projects please contact Dr Jenny Hardingham.
Investigation of circulating DNA mutations in colorectal cancer (CRC)
Circulating tumour-derived DNA (ctDNA) may be present in plasma samples from patients with CRC, and the concentration level has been inversely correlated with survival outcome. It’s thought the ctDNA is derived from circulating tumour cells (CTC) yet there are reports of cases in which ctDNA was detected but no CTC were detectable (Bettegowda et al., 2014), suggesting that tumour DNA could be released from tumour exosomes in the circulation.  ctDNA from plasma (liquid biopsy) provides a means to analyse tumour mutations to enable more sensitive disease monitoring. This means that disease recurrence or progression would be detected at an earlier time-point than would be possible with CT/PET imaging.  CTCs will also be identified in collaboration with Prof Thierry at Uni SA and correlated with ctDNA findings. Techniques include DNA isolation from plasma, digital droplet PCR, mutation or methylation analysis, statistical survival and correlative analyses.
Role of aquaporins 1 and 5 in tumour angiogenesis in colon or breast cancer (2 projects)
Aquaporins (AQPs) are water channel proteins involved in cellular water flux, and implicated in migration, angiogenesis and metastasis in cancer. The drug discovery program in Professor Yool's lab has identified several drugs that modulate aquaporin channel activity. We have found that several of these drugs are effective in vitro at reducing migration and invasion of colon cancer cells and preventing angiogenesis (tumour blood vessel formation). We aim to investigate the efficacy of these drugs in inhibiting angiogenesis in vitro and in halting metastasis in pre-clinical mouse models of human colon or breast cancer. Our hypothesis is that tumour cells that lack AQP1 activity are unable to respond to hypoxia which drives angiogenesis. We will also establish a biobank of organoids cultured from metastatic breast biopsies for research work, in assessing the response to different novel therapeutic drugs in culture, and in characterising the mutational landscape and how that changes with developing resistance.  A biobank of metastatic breast organoids is a much needed resource for future research which is currently lacking in this state. Techniques include cell culture, CRISPR gene knockout, RT-PCR, western blotting, functional assays of cell proliferation, invasion, migration, and angiogenesis and mouse models of human cancer.
Determination of resistance biomarkers in tumour tissue from patients undergoing therapy with anti-VEGF
MicroRNA expression platform will be used in correlative studies on archival tissue to identify biomarkers of resistance to bevacizumab (anti-VEGF monoclonal antibody). Techniques will include DNA and RNA/microRNA isolation from tissue blocks, running microRNA profiles, bioinformatics, and statistical analysis.
SAHMRI Colorectal Node Research Projects

Within the SAHMRI Colorectal Node (based at the BHI), the South Australian Young Onset Colorectal Cancer Study (SAYO) is a hospital-based research program for identifying the causes and consequences of colorectal (bowel) cancer in young adults. The program has an ongoing registry for research participants and an associated database, with topics spanning genetics, pathology, and psychosocial aspects of this condition.  The group consists of a research fellow, medical oncologist and hospital scientist. In addition, a network of collaborators contribute to research directions, analysis and outcomes of the project.

Research Projects suitable for Honours and Postgraduate Students

For more information about these projects please contact Associate Professor Joanne Young.

Early Onset Colorectal Cancer and Metabolic Syndrome

Our preliminary evidence suggests that the increase in incidence of colorectal (bowel) cancer in young adults may be related to the rising rate of metabolic syndrome components in the young adult population. In this study we will explore the overlap of genetic predispositions to both CRC and diabetes in young adults with pre-malignant polyps, or cancer. We will use pedigree analysis, next generation sequencing of the germline, and detailed epigenetic assays of colorectal tissue to identify markers of risk for CRC in the young adult population. It is our long-term objective to help identify at-risk young individuals in primary healthcare settings.

Medical and Psychosocial Aspects of Colorectal Cancer in Young Adults

Colorectal cancer (CRC or bowel cancer) is a common malignancy of older adults. However, over 1100 Australians under the age of 50 develop CRC each year, and the incidence of young onset disease has been rising in Australia and other Western countries during recent decades. Young adults with CRC suffer significant mortality and morbidity in the most productive time of their life. In this project, which would suit a psychology or nursing student, we will undertake a comprehensive study of the medical and psychosocial aspects of having CRC as a young adult. This will include the risk factors such as personal or family history of diabetes, family history of CRC, the diagnostic journey of the patient (since the majority of young patients present late in the course of their disease), and the life impacts post diagnosis on family and relationships, career and education, and physical and mental health.

Honours Degree Projects available in ENT Surgery

Preclinical development of a compound to block microbial secreted toxins

Our pilot data shows that specific bacterial toxins cause damage to the epithelial barrier and are significantly correlated with disease severity. In this project we will screen a library of compounds and test their ability to block the activity of these toxins. In a second step we will test the efficacy of these compounds to block epithelial damage induced by the toxins in an in vivo murine model.

The use of a surgical hydrogel to prevent adhesions after abdominal surgery

Abdominal adhesions are frequent after abdominal surgery with often devastating consequences. In this project we will use a surgical hydrogel complexed with anti-microbial and anti-adhesive compounds to prevent the formation of adhesions after abdominal surgery in an in vivo murine model.

Please contact Associate Professor Sarah Vreugde for more information.

BHI Winning News

The "BHI Winning News" newsletter is sent out at the start of each month, from February to December.

BHI Community Engagement

A comprehensive list of Community Engagement activities undertaken by BHI researchers is included in the annual .

Media & Communications

Correct use of names, addresses and email signatures Please remember that the Basil Hetzel Institute, TQEH incorporates ALL research undertaken at TQEH campus, and not just the research that takes place at the BHI research facility.

The essential roles of TGFB1 in reproduction

Ingman WV, Robertson SA. The essential roles of TGFB1 in reproduction. Cytokine Growth Factor Rev.; 2009. 20(3):233-9.

Dual roles for macrophages in ovarian cycle-associated development and remodelling of the mammary gland epithelium

Chua AC, Hodson LJ, Moldenhauer LM, Robertson SA, Ingman WV. Dual roles for macrophages in ovarian cycle-associated development and remodelling of the mammary gland epithelium. Development; 2010. 137(24):4229-38.

Regulation of epithelial cell turnover and macrophage phenotype by epithelial cell-derived transforming growth factor beta1 in the mammary gland

Sun X, Robertson SA, Ingman WV. Regulation of epithelial cell turnover and macrophage phenotype by epithelial cell-derived transforming growth factor beta1 in the mammary gland. Cytokine; 2013. 61(2):377-88.

Macrophage phenotype in the mammary gland fluctuates over the course of the estrous cycle and is regulated by ovarian steroid hormones

Hodson LJ, Chua AC, Evdokiou A, Robertson SA, Ingman WV. Macrophage phenotype in the mammary gland fluctuates over the course of the estrous cycle and is regulated by ovarian steroid hormones. Biol Reprod.; 2013. 19;89(3):65.

Toll-like receptor 4 regulates lipopolysaccharide-induced inflammation and lactation insufficiency in a mouse model of mastitis

Glynn DJ, Hutchinson MR, Ingman WV. Toll-like receptor 4 regulates lipopolysaccharide-induced inflammation and lactation insufficiency in a mouse model of mastitis. Biol. Reprod.; 2014. May 1;90(5):91.

Novel approaches to the treatment and prevention of mastitis

Recent studies indicate that antibiotics have limited efficacy in both treating and preventing mastitis. This project will investigate the underlying cause of mastitis using a combination of animal models and cell culture.

Hormonal regulation of macrophages in the breast

The ovarian hormones estrogen and progesterone regulate a variety of cellular pathways in the breast that affect cancer risk. This project will investigate how these hormones regulate macrophages using tissue cultures and histological analysis of breast tissue.

Menstrual Cycling

Macrophages in cycling mammary gland.

Macrophages in mammographic density

Macrophages are cells with diverse roles in immune responses against invading pathogens and cancer, and tissue development and homeostasis. This project will explore the function of macrophages in establishing breast density, which is a major risk factor for breast cancer.

Immune cells in healthy breast tissue

Human Research Ethics Application (HREA)

As part of the initiative to streamline ethics approval, NHMRC has developed the Human Research Ethics Application (HREA) as a replacement for the National Ethics Application Form (NEAF). The HREA replaces the NEAF in Online Forms for all new applications created for a full HREC review process. Any NEAF created before 1 September 2017 can still be completed and submitted and SSA forms can still be created and attached. The HREA should be used for a full research ethics submission to a Human Research Ethics Committee at a South Australian public health organisation. The HREA must be used for any multi-jurisdiction research application where ethical approval is being sought under the National Mutual Acceptance Scheme. A fact sheet for using the HREA via Online Forms is available here. Further information from the NHMRC about the HREA is available here and a HREA User Guide is available here. CALHN HREC documentation will be updated to include HREA information in due course.

Senior Statistician

Novel Applications of Machine Learning in Healthcare
Machine learning refers to data-driven automated analysis techniques that rely on sophisticated pattern recognition to reach insights from large-scale datasets. Machine learning is widely used in non-healthcare industries for rapid automated analyses of massive volumes of unstructured data. In collaboration with the School of Computer Science at the University of Adelaide this project tests the application of machine learning methods to solve common healthcare problems using routinely collected hospital data.
Impact of sleep deprivation on the risk of readmission
Hospitals readmissions are exceedingly common. These readmissions not only occur due to the lingering effects of the acute illness but may also because of stressors experienced during the initial hospital stay such as sleep deprivation. This clinical study measures the extent of sleep deprivation among patients in coronary care using sleep measurement devices and questionnaires to determine the association between the extent of sleep deprivation and the risk of readmission.
Reducing Unwarranted Variation in Early Complications After Cardiac Pacemaker and Defibrillator Implantation among Australian Hospitals
Implanted pacemakers and cardiac defibrillators are common and costly procedures performed in Australian hospitals. While very effective at treating heart rhythm abnormalities, patients can suffer serious complications which can vary among hospitals suggesting that complications are related to hospital quality. Supported by a HCF Research Foundation grant, the aim of this project is to develop methods to detect unwarranted variation in early complications, and the necessary technical requirements to integrate reporting into clinical practice, using data routinely collected by hospitals.
ORION: Leveraging Big Data to Inform Nationwide Cardiovascular Health Outcomes
The Observing Recurrent Incidence of Adverse Outcomes following HospitalisatioNs (ORION) study brings together a decade of cardiovascular hospitalisation data from all Australian States. Encompassing millions of healthcare records from more than 450 public hospitals and many private facilities, ORION allows our team to assess important end results of hospital-based cardiovascular care on a national scale and understand how these outcomes vary among the many healthcare facilities in Australia.  
  • National Outcomes of Common Cardiovascular Conditions
Hospitalisations for conditions such as heart failure, acute myocardial infarction, and stroke are exceedingly common. However, outcomes following these hospitalisations are not well known with limited local data. This study examines short-and long-term outcomes such as deaths and readmissions following cardiovascular hospitalizations. The results of this study will inform patients and clinicians who are seeking to better understand the prognosis.  
  • Reducing Unwarranted Variation in Early Complications After Cardiac Pacemaker and Defibrillator Implantation among Australian Hospitals
Implanted pacemakers and cardiac defibrillators are common and costly procedures performed in Australian hospitals. While very effective at treating heart rhythm abnormalities, patients can suffer serious complications which can vary among hospitals suggesting that complications are related to hospital quality. Supported by an HCF Research Foundation grant, the aim of this project is to develop methods to detect unwarranted variation in early complications, and the necessary technical requirements to integrate reporting into clinical practice, using data routinely collected by hospitals.  
  • Value of Elective Coronary Angiography and Percutaneous Coronary Intervention
Coronary angiogram and percutaneous coronary intervention are common cardiac procedures and their benefits are well established in the acute setting. However, the value of elective is increasingly debated. In this project, we seek to define the value of elective coronary angiography and PCI by estimating the procedural outcomes and costs. The specific aims 1) to assess frequency of early outcomes including deaths, unplanned readmissions and procedural-related outcomes complications; 2) Determine the cost associated with these procedures and near-term outcomes; and (3) To evaluate institutional variation in outcome rates that may suggest variation in care quality.  
  • Outcomes of Catheter Ablation for Atrial Fibrillation
Catheter ablation for atrial fibrillation (AF), first introduced in 1998, has rapidly evolved from an investigational procedure to a guidelines-recommended therapeutic option. This project aims to evaluate procedural safety and outcomes using national data irrespective of age or payer. The results of this study will facilitate a better-informed decision of undergoing catheter ablation for AF, as well as assist hospitals and policymakers seeking to improve the quality of this increasingly common procedure.  
  • Avoidable Healthcare Costs Associated with Hospital Readmissions
Unplanned readmissions are distressing to patients, exposures patients to hospital-acquired conditions and are a major cause of bed-block. However, the avoidable costs associated with readmission is poorly understood even though cost-considerations are a major driver of healthcare decision making. The objectives of this study are to: 1) enumerating the cost of unplanned readmissions where a cardiovascular condition has been the primary discharge diagnosis; and 2) identifying key predictors of costs associated with those readmissions. This will inform policy-making decisions and identify patient subsets who may require extra resources during their care.

Frequent attenders with mental disorders at a general hospital emergency department

Wooden, M. D., Air, T. M., Schrader, G. D., Wieland, B., & Goldney, R. D. Frequent attenders with mental disorders at a general hospital emergency department. Emergency Medicine Australasia; 2009. 21(3), 191-195.

Psychosis, socioeconomic disadvantage, and health service use in South Australia: Findings from the Second Australian National Survey of Psychosis 2015

Sweeney, S., Air, T., Zannettino, L., & Galletly, C. Psychosis, socioeconomic disadvantage, and health service use in South Australia: Findings from the Second Australian National Survey of Psychosis 2015. Frontiers in Public Health; 2015. 3.

Epidemiology of Cardiovascular Disease and Depression

Air, T., Tully, P. J., Sweeney, S., & Beltrame, J. Epidemiology of Cardiovascular Disease and Depression. Book: Cardiovascular Diseases and Depression (editors Baune & Tully. Published by Springer) ; 2016. pp. 5-21.

Readmissions after Hospitalization for Heart Failure, Acute Myocardial Infarction, or Pneumonia among Young and Middle-Aged Adults: A Retrospective Observational Cohort Study

Ranasinghe I, Wang Y, Dharmarajan K, Hsieh AF, Bernheim SM, Krumholz HM. Readmissions after Hospitalization for Heart Failure, Acute Myocardial Infarction, or Pneumonia among Young and Middle-Aged Adults: A Retrospective Observational Cohort Study. PLoS Med; 2014. Sep 30;11(9):e1001737.

Long-term mortality following interhospital transfer for acute myocardial infarction

Ranasinghe I, Barzi F, Brieger D, Gallagher M. Long-term mortality following interhospital transfer for acute myocardial infarction. Heart; 2015. Jul;101(13):1032-40.

Differences in Colonoscopy Quality Among Facilities: Development of a Post-Colonoscopy Risk-Standardized Rate of Unplanned Hospital Visits

Ranasinghe I, Parzynski CS, Searfoss R, Montague J, Lin Z, Allen J, Vender R, Bhat K, Ross JS, Bernheim S, Krumholz HM, Drye EE. Differences in Colonoscopy Quality Among Facilities: Development of a Post-Colonoscopy Risk-Standardized Rate of Unplanned Hospital Visits. Gastroenterology; 2016 Jan;150(1):103-13.

Long-Term Risk of Device-Related Complications and Reoperations after Implantable Cardioverter-Defibrillator Therapy

Ranasinghe I, Parzynski CS, Freeman JV, Dreyer RP, Ross JS, Akar JG, Krumholz HM, Curtis JP. Long-Term Risk of Device-Related Complications and Reoperations after Implantable Cardioverter-Defibrillator Therapy. Annals of Internal Medicine ; 2016. May 3. doi: 10.7326/M15-2732.

Predicting 30-Day Readmission or Death in Heart Failure: Looking beyond the C-Statistic

Ranasinghe I, Krumholz HM. Predicting 30-Day Readmission or Death in Heart Failure: Looking beyond the C-Statistic. JAMA Cardiology ; 2016. Nov 1;1(8):965.

Safety Monitoring and Reporting in Clinical Trials Involving Therapeutic Goods

In 2016 National Health and Medical Research Council (NHMRC) released new guidance on Safety Monitoring and Reporting in Clinical Trials Involving Therapeutic Goods (the Guidance) to replace the 2009 Australian Health Ethics Committee Position Statement of the same name (the Position Statement).  In 2018 the NHMRC released new guidance on Reporting of Serious Breaches of Good Clinical Practice or the Protocol for Trials Involving Therapeutic Goods. CALHN Research Services has prepared a guideline document for researchers and sponsors detailing CALHN's submission requirements under these new guidances. CALHN Clinical Trial Safety Monitoring and Serious Breach Reporting Guideline Reports to the CALHN HREC must be made on the appropriate form available under the Forms tab below. For further information contact: Email: Health.CALHNResearchEthics@sa.gov.au Phone: +61 8 7117 2218  

Credentialing & Scope of Clinical Practice

Medical, dental, allied and scientific health, and nurse practitioners must undertake a regular credentialing process and have a current scope of clinical practice for the health service in which they work.

Data Scientist

Development of a glucocorticoid impact questionnaire
Glucocorticoids (GC) are a class of steroid hormones with immunosuppressive and anti-inflammatory effects. However, they are also associated with a number of side effects. While the treating clinician may focus on the most clinically serious GC related adverse effects, such as an increased risk of cardiovascular disease, diabetes and bone density loss, little is known about the patient perspective of the impact of GC treatment. The aim of this project is to develop a question to measure the impact of GC treatment from a patient perspective. These types of patient reported outcome measures (PROM) are a new era in clinical research which will enable more patient-centred treatment decisions.  
Healthcare utilization in patients with chronic musculoskeletal disorders
The North West Adelaide Health Study (NWAHS) is a representative biomedical population cohort study of approximately 4000 adults aged 18 years and over recruited from the northern and western regions of Adelaide. The study was designed to assess the prevalence of priority conditions and to inform policy decisions about health care provision in South Australia, and NWAHS Stage 2 data collection specifically focused on information relating to musculoskeletal conditions. The aim of this project is to determine healthcare utilisation in patients with chronic musculoskeletal conditions, using NWAHS data integrated with Medicare Benefits Schedule (MBS) and Pharmaceutical Benefits Scheme (PBS) data.  
The epidemiology of Polymyalgia Rheumatica
Polymyalgia rheumatica (PMR) is an inflammatory syndrome with pain or stiffness, usually in the neck, shoulders, upper arms, and hips, but which may occur all over the body. The aim of this project is to perform a systematic review of the epidemiology of PMR and to determine the epidemiology, clinical features and management of PMR in Australia, using available Australian General Practice Data.

Fast Facts: BHI, TQEH research in 2019

In 2019:
  • - over $20 million in grants, clinical academic salaries, scholarships and infrastructure support was obtained by researchers at the Basil Hetzel Institute, TQEH
  • - over 100 clinical and research staff were based at the BHI, TQEH
  • - more than 80 higher degree students were enrolled through The University of Adelaide and University of South Australia
  • - over 330 publications were published in peer-reviewed journals
Full details can be found in the 2019 BHI Research Report.

Impacted Departments & Service Agreement Forms

If your study involves above standard care assessments/procedures or requires services of another department you need to gain authorisation from the Head of Unit and provide evidence of support to the Business Consultant and RGO including the amount of any costs agreed.  The following forms and templates are available to request quotes for services and negotiate interdepartmental agreements. SA Pathology: SA Medical Imaging: LMH - Medical Imaging Trial Approval Procedure SA Pharmacy: To request the current fees for your project contact Jacinta Nagle on 08 8282 1674 or  Health.LMHClinicalTrialsPharmacy@sa.gov.au  Other Impacted Departments: To request quote for services from impacted/supporting Departments that do not have their own agreement template or quote form, the following form can be used to request support/costs from the Department and attached to the SSA in lieu of signing the SSA.    

Obtaining Financial Oversight on the SSA

It is an SA Health requirement that all researchers obtain approval for their project’s budget from the LHN Business Consultant – if they are: a) planning to undertake a research project at SA Health; or b) planning to utilise SA Health resources to undertake a research project A budget review is required to ensure approval of your Governance submission. The budget review process demonstrates to the RGO:  the financial viability of each project; and  ensures all charges associated with the project have been appropriately approved. Please make a time to see the Business Consultant aligned to the Principal Investigator to discuss the study budget and cost allocations. You should take the following documents with you to your meeting with the Business Consultant.  A draft version of the CTRA  and your study Budget (labour time, project expenses reflecting the cost of running the study at this site)  Project protocol (including what protocol specific procedures are above standard of care in NALHN as determined by the PI)  Statement of support or approval from each Head of Department to be used to conduct the study and their costs (if applicable)  SA Health Cost Centre number  Expected number of participants Questions that will need to be answered in the budget review process are:  What resources will SA Health have to contribute to conduct the project?  How will the cost of these resources be funded? The Business Consultant will sign your SSA or the SSA Attachment: Financial Oversight Form if you have completed this form before the SSA. Once authorised by the Business Consultant the Sponsor can proceed to execute the agreement and provide  the partially executed agreements (x 3 originals) for inclusion in your SSA Submission. Please Note: Studies that are undertaken as part of normal research hours with internal departmental costing (i.e. wages) of less than $10,000 generally do not require Business sign off within NALHN. Studies with any external funding require sign off regardless of value.

Budget Negotiation

Determining the Study Budget: The Research Budget Template referenced below is available on request from the RGO: HealthNALHNRgo@sa.gov.au
  1. Review procedures / participant visits (protocol schedule of assessments). Checking if there are any additional assessments required as part of the inclusion/exclusion criteria, lab manual & radiology manual etc. or as a result of an expected/known Adverse Event.
  2. Determine above standard care procedures and establish which Supporting Departments will be required to fulfill the procedures listed in the protocol and make contact to obtain costing.
    • Research Budget Template: Supporting Departments Worksheet (request from RGO)
  3. Identify rates for salary based procedures using the following tools:
  4. Calculate Salary for Investigator time, Clinical Research Coordinator time, (on costs & overhead if applicable)
    • Research Budget Template: Salary Calculator Worksheet (request from RGO)
  5. Per Participant Budget (add all identified procedures to the Research Budget Template) and calculate amount per visit/procedure) by estimating the labour time and apply overhead
    • Research Budget Template: Per Participant Budget Worksheet (request from RGO)
  6. Add Site Costs
    • Research Budget Template: Site Costs Worksheet (request from RGO)
  7. Add Supporting Department Costs by using the following tools and contacting the impacted Department for quote
  8. Request the sponsor’s budget; cross reference the budget with the Schedule of Assessments in the Protocol ensuring to check all footnotes (e.g. the number of assessments for each visit can vary depending on the visit i.e. ECGs or PK collection time points).  Compare it with your site budget and negotiate.
  9. Once the budget is agreed and negotiated it can be transposed into the CTRA by the Sponsor.  Request and review the draft CTRA and addition of site details (see CTRA Requirements: http://www.basilhetzelinstitute.com.au/research/information-for-researchers/nalhn/complete-governance-application/)
  10. Submit the draft CTRA to the RGO for pre-review and,
  11. Schedule a meeting with the Business Consultant to discuss the negotiated budget, ensuring that you can demonstrate cost recovery to obtain financial authorisation.

ICH/Good Clinical Practice (GCP) Training

The following are links to free on-line ICH/Good Clinical Practice (GCP) training modules: Each require the user to register for a login before commencing the training modules.

Endocrinology

The Endocrinology Unit conducts research in areas relating to diabetes, endocrinology and metabolism.

Medical Staff

Name Position
A/Prof Peak Mann Mah Consultant Endocrinologist/General Physician
Dr Parind Vora Consultant Endocrinologist

Trial Staff

Name Position Contact Details
Brenda Trezona Clinical Trial Nurse +61 8 8282 0666

Neurology

The Neurology team specialise in Stroke, Movement Disorders/Parkinson Disease, Neurophysiology, Neuroimmunology and Multiple Sclerosis. The LMH sees approximately 300 strokes a year. The unit provides neurophysiology services including EEGs and nerve conduction studies/EMG.

Medical Staff

Name Position
A/Prof Tim Kleinig Head of Neurology/Stroke Services
Dr Deborah Field Neruology Consultant

Trial Staff

Name Position Contact Details
Vanessa Maxwell Clinical Trial Nurse +61 8 8282 0631

Oncology

The LMH Cancer Centre offers both chemotherapy and radiotherapy. The new centre houses two linear accelerators, features a new waiting area for patients and has increased the number of chemotherapy chairs by 50 per cent to cater for the addition of 1500 new referrals/year since Transforming Health.

Medical Staff

Name Position
Dr Jacqui Adams Head of Cancer Services
Dr Rohit Joshi Consultant Oncologist
Dr Christopher Hocking Consultant Oncologist
Dr Nimit Singhal Consultant Oncologist
A/Prof Tim Price Consultant Oncologist

Trial Staff

Name Position Contact Details
Alison Griffiths Clinical Trial Coordinator +61 8 8282 0833
Rebecca Cato Clinical Trial Coordinator +61 8 8282 0833
Sue Brealey Clinical Trial Administration +61 8 8282 0833

Psychiatry

Medical Staff

Name Position
A/Prof Dennis Liu Consultant Psychiatrist
Prof Cherrie Galletly Consultant Psychiatrist

Trial Staff

Name Position Contact Details
Beverley Hisee Clinical Trials Coordinator +61 8 8182 9554

Gastroenterology & Hepatology

The Gastroenterology team specialise in all GI tract related disorders. The Department provides routine diagnostic endoscopic procedures including gastroscopy and colonoscopy and have an internationally recognised interventional endoscopic service.

Medical Staff

Name Position
Dr Damian Harding Consultant
Dr Asif Chinnaratha Consultant

Trial Staff

Name Position Contact Details
Lucy Ralton Clinical Trial Coordinator +61 8 8282 1897

Cardiology

Medical Staff

Name Position
A/Prof Margaret Arstall Director of Cardiology
A/Prof Chris Zeitz Consultant Cardiologist

Trial Staff

Name Position Contact Details
Jane Rose Clinical Trial Manager +61 8 8282 0655
Bernie Hoffmann Clinical Trial Coordinator +61 8 8182 9000
Jan Parkinson Clinical Trial Assistant +61 8 8182 9475

Do your file names follow the same format?

Please use consistent file names when submitting electronic documents i.e. PICF_Version1.0_20160607, Protocol_Version1.2_20161011

Have you changed your file names so the titles reflect the document name and version?

You should not use the file name automatically generated by your scanner.  Changing the file name allows the RGO to quickly identify your attachments for review.

Do all your documents/attachments have version numbers/dates in the footers?

The RGO can only endorse HREC approved documents for use on site i.e. the version number or date in the footer of your documents should match the version listed on the HREC approval letter?  Without evidence of HREC approval your document i.e. PICF or protocol will not be accepted for use at LMH.

Do I need to add the RGO Contact details for complaints in the Participant Information & Consent Form (PICF)?

Only if the approving HREC is not an SA Health Committee. The approving SA Health HREC contact details should be used in the first instance should the participant want to speak with someone independent of the project or make a complaint about the study/investigators. Example (wording for use in the PICF): when the reviewing HREC is an SA HREC “If you have any complaints about any aspect of the project, the way it is being conducted or any questions about being a research participant in general, then you may contact”: Reviewing HREC approving this research and HREC Executive Officer details:
Edit
Reviewing HREC name Central Adelaide Local Health Network Human Research Ethics Committee (CALHN HREC)
HREC Executive Officer Heather O’Dea
Telephone 8222 6841
Email Health.CALHNResearchEthics@sa.gov.au
Example (wording for use in the PICF): when the HREC is interstate “For matters relating to research at the site at which you are participating, the details of the local site complaints person are” Complaints contact person:
Edit
Name Alison Barr
Position NALHN Research Governance Officer
Telephone 8182 9346
Email healthnalhnrgo@sa.gov.au

My project covers multiple SA Health sites, how do I find the other RGOs?

RGO Contact List http://www.sahealth.sa.gov.au/wps/wcm/connect/768b3f004aaf37e19d83fd7633bbffe0/SA+Health+RGO+List+-+Aug+17.pdf?MOD=AJPERES&CACHEID=ROOTWORKSPACE-768b3f004aaf37e19d83fd7633bbffe0-lZH.-Qa  

Can I start my SSA while my project is still under review by the HREC?

Yes.  NALHN supports dual submission of governance and ethics, this allows the review to occur in parallel.  Governance authorisation can only be given to those projects approved by ethics.  If any documents change as a result of ethics queries you will need to re-submit these for governance review along with the ethics approval letter.  Alternatively, you are encouraged to work on your governance application before the HREC has approved your project so that it is ready to submit to the RGO as soon as you receive your HREC approval letter.

SSA – Site Specific Application

Full Site Specific Applications (SSA) must be completed online https://au.ethicsform.org/SignIn.aspx and submitted in PDF to the Research Governance Office (RGO). If you used Online Forms to complete the Ethics Application key project information will be populated into the relevant fields of the SSA to reduce the need for duplication.  You may need to change the information to ensure it is site specific. Completing the Application If you have any questions regarding the content of the SSA including how to answer specific questions in the application please review the NALHN Specific – SSA Completion Guide. NALHN-SSA-Completion-Guide-Jan-2018 If you cannot find your answer in the guide please contact the RGO: mailto:healthnalhnrgo@sa.gov.au Research Coordinator Form (Clinical Trials Only) This form must be completed and submitted alongside the SSA. Research Coordinator Form Technical Support Technical support for the application form is available: Tel: +61 2 903 78 404 (available from 10am to 4pm AEST Mon to Fri) E-mail: helpdesk@infonetica.net Creating a Submission Code Once all sections of your SSA are complete, it is necessary to create a submission code before providing the application to the RGO.  This is done in Online Forms by:
  1. Selecting the SSA under “My Project” in the menu bar
  2. Select the “Submission” tab
  3. Click the “Generate Submission Code” button
Generating Submission Code 2 Once you have generated the submission code you must print a copy of the form (the submission code generated will appear in the footer of the form).  A copy of the SSA and all supporting documentation must then be submitted to the Research Governance Office along with the SSA Research Governance Application Cover Letter Jan 2018 Note: Generating a submission code does not send your application to the RGO, it assigns a version code to the bottom of the document and removes the draft watermark.  All page numbers must have matching codes before submission to the RGO.  These codes must not be altered by hand. Evidence of Human Research Ethics Committee (HREC) approval must be provided to the RGO before the CEO/Delegate can authorise the SSA. Please note that project authorisation is not instantaneous nor is it guaranteed.  In the event that the project is not authorised, feedback will be provided. Dual submission: site assessment and ethical review may occur in parallel.  However the decision to authorise or not authorise the commencement of a research project at the site can only be made once the HREC has approved the project.    

Other Essential Documents

Other documents required with your SSA include:
  • Participant Information Sheet and Consent Form (PICF)
  • CV & GCP Certificate for the Principal Investigator (PI)
  • Ethics Approval Letter
  • Protocol
  • Investigator Brochure
  • Copy of advertisements (flyers, posters)

Site Specific - Participant Information and Consent Forms (PICFs)

NALHN endorses use of the NHMRC standardised PICFs which are designed for three categories of participants identified by the National Statement:
  • Individual participant
  • Child participant
  • Participants unable to provide consent
Templates are available on the NHMRC website:  https://hrep.nhmrc.gov.au/toolbox/standardised-forms It is an SA Health requirement that the institution logo is used – please insert the SA Health Logo in the Header of your Participant Information Sheet and Consent Form (right click on image, copy and paste into your document). SA Health Logo Site Contact details for Complaints  The contact details of the approving HREC  should be included in the Participant Information Sheet  should the participant want to speak with someone independent of the project or make a complaint about the study/investigators.  However, if the approving HREC is not an SA Health HREC, the RGO contact details must be included. Example 1: Where the reviewing HREC is an SA Health HREC e.g. Central Adelaide Local Health Network Human Research Ethics Committee (CALHN HREC) “If you have any complaints about any aspect of the project, the way it is being conducted or any questions about being a research participant in general, then you may contact”: Reviewing HREC approving this research and HREC Executive Officer details:
Reviewing HREC name Central Adelaide Local Health Network Human Research Ethics Committee (CALHN HREC)
HREC Executive Officer Heather O’Dea
Telephone 8222 6841
Email Health.CALHNResearchEthics@sa.gov.au
Example 2: Wording for use in the PICF when the approving HREC is not an SA Health Committee “For matters relating to research at the site at which you are participating, the details of the local site complaints person are
Name Alison Barr
Position NALHN Research Governance Officer
Telephone 8182 9346
Email healthnalhnrgo@sa.gov.au

GCP

A Principal Investigator is the individual responsible for the conduct of a clinical trial. They must ensure that it complies with GCP guidelines. If a trial is conducted by a team of individuals at a site, the principal investigator is the responsible leader of the team and may delegate tasks to other team members. NALHN requires that all principal investigators on clinical trials hold current good clinical practice (GCP) certification.  As the PI is responsible for the conduct of the study at the site, it is their responsibility to ensure that their research staffs have GCP training. NALHN has adopted the minimum standards defined by TransCelerate Biopharma Inc. http://www.transceleratebiopharmainc.com/gcp-training-attestation/  to recognise GCP training courses that contain material meeting the minimum criteria agreed to by its member organisations.  Acceptable GCP training courses are those listed on TransCelerate Biopharma Inc. INC Research IATA & GCP Refresher Training https://www.incrclinicaleducation.com/Account/Registration ARCS GCP Training https://www.arcs.com.au/ The ARCS Applied GCP Training course meets the minimum standards defined by TransCelerate Biopharma Inc. The course, Applied GCP Training for Investigational Sites and Sponsors Representatives (Certificates 1, 2 and 3), can be undertaken at the researchers own pace and takes approximately 8-10 hours to compete. The training is principally focused on best practice in clinical trials research but is sufficiently broad in scope so as to benefit all clinical researchers. Upon completion of the program researchers should have a good understanding of the Australian regulations and ICH-GCP and ideas to consider when adhering to these during the conduct of research and also a clear understanding of the roles and responsibilities of all stakeholders in clinical research. Researchers who complete the training revive a certificate of completion which is valid for three years from the completion date.

Advertisements

All advertisements must be first approved by the Media and Communications Department: HEALTH.NorthernCommunication@sa.gov.au Evidence of approval from Media and Communications must be included with your SSA.

DCSI Check

SA Health complies with the legal requirement that every person seeking to work under the Children’s Protection Act and Regulations 2010 or the Aged Care Act 1997 undergo a criminal and relevant history screening assessment. This applies whether or not the person is currently working in SA Health. The assessments are carried out by the Department for Communities and Social Inclusion and are current for three years. The cost of the assessment is borne by prospective researcher.  http://screening.dcsi.sa.gov.au/

Confidentiality Deed

Researchers may come into contact with information that must be kept confidential. Any person engaged in activities on NALHN sites should be aware of the fact that a breach of confidentiality is an offence under Section 93 of the Health Care Act 2008 (SA) (‘the Act’). Any such offence can result in the termination of the access, action for damages and/or prosecution. All non SA Health staff must sign a Confidentiality Deed and attach it with their SSA.  NALHN Confidentiality Deed non-NALHN Employee

Indemnity

Medicines Australia Standard Indemnity templates are endorsed by SA Health: https://medicinesaustralia.com.au/policy/clinical-trials/indemity-and-compensation-guidelines/ Site details for inclusion in the template (select appropriate site): Northern Adelaide Local Health Network Incorporated, operating as Lyell McEwin Hospital (“the Indemnified Party”) or Northern Adelaide Local Health Network Incorporated, operating as Modbury Hospital (“the Indemnified Party”)

CTRAs – Clinical Research Agreements

If your project involves a medicine or device you need to submit an agreement between the parties involved.  This is required whether you are involved in a :
  • Collaborative Group project
  • Commercially Sponsored project
  • Contract Research Organisation or,
  • Project funded from a grant
Medicines Australia Standard CTRA templates are endorsed by SA Health and should be used wherever possible to avoid the need for legal review:  https://medicinesaustralia.com.au/policy/clinical-trials/clinical-trials-research-agreements/ Amendments to Schedule 7 or Schedule 4 require SEBS approval.  Please see the above link for further information. Site Details for inclusion in the template (select appropriate site):
Edit
Name of Institution: Northern Adelaide Local Health Network Incorporated, operating as Lyell McEwin Hospital
Address: Haydown Road, Elizabeth Vale, South Australia 5112
ABN: 46 371 200 573
Edit
Name of Institution: Northern Adelaide Local Health Network Incorporated, operating as Modbury Hospital
Address: 41-69 Smart Road, Modbury, South Australia 5092
ABN: 46 371 200 573
Schedule 2: (Please include the following information) Governance Fee: Research governance submission fees are payable to the Institution according to the current fee schedule. The research governance office will invoice the sponsor directly. http://www.sahealth.sa.gov.au/wps/wcm/connect/public+content/sa+health+internet/about+us/health+and+medical+research/research+ethics/research+ethics+and+governance+fees Pharmacy Fees: Pharmacy fees inclusive of dispensing will be invoiced directly by Pharmacy. Payee: All payments listed in this schedule will be made by the Sponsor to Institution upon receipt of a tax invoice by direct credit. Bank: Commonwealth Bank of Australia Branch: 96 King William St, Adelaide BSB: 065 266      Account Number: 10020646 Account Name: NALHN Oracle Operating ABN: 46 371 200 573 Swift Code: CTBAAU2S Note: The sponsor is responsible for study payments and must be the party in Schedule 2 that NALHN will invoice For information on how to negotiate the study budget for inclusion in the CTRA please review the following Study Budget and Financial Authorisation page: http://www.basilhetzelinstitute.com.au/research/information-for-researchers/nalhn/study-budget-financial-authorisation/

eCTN

For sponsors submitting eCTNs for clinical trials being conducted at Lyell McEwin or Modbury Hospital the approving authority information is provided below: Name of Approving Authority:  Northern Adelaide Local Health Network Incorporated operating  as Lyell McEwin Hospital (select appropriate site), or Northern Adelaide Local Health Network Incorporated operating as Modbury Hospital Approving Authority Contact Officer:  Alison Barr Position:  Research Governance Officer Contact Phone:  +61 8 8182 9346 Contact Email:  Alison.Barr@sa.gov.au

What is the BHI?

The Basil Hetzel Institute for Translational Health Research (BHI) is the productive research arm of The Queen Elizabeth Hospital (TQEH). A $19 milliion purpose-built research facility was opened in March 2009 and is located on Woodville Road opposite the main campus of The Queen Elizabeth Hospital. It is located 15 minutes from the Adelaide CBD in the city’s western suburbs. All research groups have strong links to the clinical divisions within TQEH underpinning translational health research. This ‘bench to bedside’ approach is at the forefront of an emerging area of medical science that aims to improve public health through collaborative discoveries and innovations in patient care, education and research. Research conducted by the BHI covers a broad spectrum, exploring causes, potential improvements in therapeutic outcomes and the prevention of some of the most serious and common health conditions facing our community today. These include cancer, cardiovascular disease, arthritis, diabetes, respiratory diseases and stroke. The BHI also has long-standing teaching and research affiliations with the University of Adelaide, the University of South Australia and Flinders University, which offer a range of undergraduate and postgraduate research training opportunities. Several academic departments, including the University of Adelaide Disciplines of Surgery, Medicine and Psychiatry, are based at The Queen Elizabeth Hospital.

Clinical Trials

Each clinical trial to be conducted at a site within SA Health and sponsored by a third party external to SA Health must be governed by a written agreement clarifying the obligations and responsibilities of the parties involved in the trial.

National Mutual Acceptance

Australian State and Territory Departments of Health have signed a Memorandum of Understanding for mutual acceptance of scientific and ethical review of multi-centre human research projects undertaken in Public Health Organisations. Currently New South Wales, Queensland, South Australia and Victoria are participating in National Mutual Acceptance (NMA). Further information is available below: National Mutual Acceptance Brochure National Mutual Acceptance Fact Sheet 2016 NHMRC Safety Monitoring and Reporting in Clinical Trials Involving Therapeutic Goods - The Guidance National Mutual Acceptance Standard Principles for Operation National Mutual Acceptance Monitoring and Reporting Tables - based on the 2009 NHMRC Position Statement  

Procedures

Submission

CALHN Required Submission Documents CALHN HREC Drug and Device Studies Checklist SA Health Research Ethics and Governance Fees Schedule

Complaints

The CALHN HREC is committed to fulfilling Section 5.6 of The National Statement on Ethical Conduct in Human Research  and ensuring that research is conducted according to the Australian Code for the Responsible Conduct of Research by ensuring all complaints are handled appropriately. All complaints must be handled promptly with due sensitivity and in recognition of principles of natural justice.

Receiving complaints

Research participants, their families and other concerned parties have the right to communicate their concerns about any aspect of the services provided and are encouraged  to do so. To facilitate this process the HREC will ensure that all Information Sheets for research participants contain the contact information for the HREC Executive Officer. The HREC may receive the complaint in any form: in person, by telephone, by email or in writing. If the complaint is not received in writing the complainant will be encouraged to document the complaint in a letter or email to the Chairperson of the CALHN HREC but, although desirable, this is not essential for the complaint to be investigated. Notes are taken by the person receiving the complaint (usually the Executive Officer) and a confidential memorandum is written to the Chairperson of CALHN HREC. The complainant may be identified or anonymous. If the complainant is identified a letter acknowledging the receipt of the complaint will be sent to the complainant irrespective of the nature of the complaint. This letter will be sent within 5 working days of receiving the complaint. Details of the complaint are recorded in the HREC Complaints Database by the Executive Officer in the first instance and then updated by the Chairperson or other delegated person in due course. CALHN HREC Executive Officer: Tel. +61 8 8222 6841 Health.CALHNResearchEthics@sa.gov.au

Site Specific Assessment (SSA)

The Site Specific Assessment (SSA) Form should be used for governance assessment of research projects involving more than low risk to participants, and where the research proposal has been submitted for ethical and scientific review using the National Ethics Application Form (NEAF). The SSA process considers the following:
  • Adequate resources (financial, human, equipment and infrastructure) for the research to proceed at the site and identified as appropriate, accountable and available;
  • Researchers have the necessary expertise and experience (Medical Officers must be credentialed by the CALHN Credentialing Office in order to conduct clinical research); if not, relevant training is planned before carrying out their role in the research study.
  • Compliance with relevant laws, policies and codes of conduct relating to matters such as privacy, confidentiality, consent, bio-safety, professional standards, and radiation safety.
Site Specific Assessment (SSA) Form Guidelines SSA Annual Declaration Form for Research Personnel Full Site Specific Assessment Form Checklist Insurance Cover Guidelines and Checklist SA Health Legal Governance and Insurance Services Research Trials Flowchart Participant Information and Consent Form Guidelines SSA Amendment Form

Contract Review

All research contracts require review by the Research Office. The Research Contracts Officer negotiates contact terms regarding these agreements between various parties and CALHN, including staff members, Universities and other Hospitals, SAHMRI and National and International companies. Intellectual Property and/or Finance (other than a grant) agreements also require review. Contact the Research Contracts Officer for further information.